Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In Python for the *nix, does time.sleep() block the thread or the process?

share|improve this question
10  
A simple one liner question whose implications are much beyond that. I was exactly looking for this. –  Anupam Saini Feb 21 '12 at 11:42
    
This question was exactly what I needed, thanks! –  Chet Apr 26 '12 at 3:43

4 Answers 4

up vote 157 down vote accepted

It blocks the thread. If you look in Modules/timemodule.c in the Python source, you'll see that in the call to floatsleep(), the substantive part of the sleep operation is wrapped in a Py_BEGIN_ALLOW_THREADS and Py_END_ALLOW_THREADS block, allowing other threads to continue to execute while the current one sleeps. You can also test this with a simple python program:

import time
from threading import Thread

class worker(Thread):
    def run(self):
    	for x in xrange(0,11):
    		print x
    		time.sleep(1)

class waiter(Thread):
    def run(self):
    	for x in xrange(100,103):
    		print x
    		time.sleep(5)

def run():
    worker().start()
    waiter().start()

Which will print:

>>> thread_test.run()
0
100
>>> 1
2
3
4
5
101
6
7
8
9
10
102
share|improve this answer

It will just sleep the thread except in the case where your application has only a single thread, in which case it will sleep the thread and effectively the process as well.

The python documentation on sleep doesn't specify this however, so I can certainly understand the confusion!

http://docs.python.org/2/library/time.html

share|improve this answer
6  
Upped for referencing documentation. –  Patrick Johnmeyer Sep 18 '08 at 17:12
5  
@PatrickJohnmeyer You upvoted for including a link to documentation that he said "doesn't specify this" –  Michael Mrozek Jan 10 '14 at 17:11
    

Just the thread.

share|improve this answer

yes, agree with Burly.

The thread will block, but the process is still alive.

In a single threaded application, this means everything is blocked while you sleep. In a multithreaded application, only the thread you explicitly 'sleep' will block and the other threads still run within the process.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.