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Is it possible to have one controller use another?

For example:

This HTML document simply prints a message delivered by the MessageCtrl controller in the messageCtrl.js file.

<html xmlns:ng="http://angularjs.org/">
<head>
    <meta charset="utf-8" />
    <title>Inter Controller Communication</title>
</head>
<body>
    <div ng:controller="MessageCtrl">
        <p>{{message}}</p>
    </div>

    <!-- Angular Scripts -->
    <script src="http://code.angularjs.org/angular-0.9.19.js" ng:autobind></script>
    <script src="js/messageCtrl.js" type="text/javascript"></script>
</body>
</html>

The controller file contains the following code:

function MessageCtrl()
{
    this.message = function() { 
        return "The current date is: " + new Date().toString(); 
    };
}

Which simply prints the current date;

If I were to add another controller, DateCtrl which handed the date in a specific format back to MessageCtrl, how would one go about doing this? The DI framework seems to be concerned with XmlHttpRequests and assessing services.

Can anyone help?

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2  
This google group thread, groups.google.com/d/topic/angular/m_mn-8gnNt4/discussion, discusses 5 ways controllers can talk to each other. –  Mark Rajcok Aug 12 '12 at 1:49
    
There are good answers here already, so I'd just like to point out that for the particular use case mentioned, perhaps an AngularJS filter would be a better solution? Just thought I'd mention it :) –  Joe Dyndale Nov 24 '12 at 19:16
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9 Answers

up vote 184 down vote accepted

There are multiple ways how to communicate between controllers.

The best one is probably sharing a service:

function FirstController(someDataService) {
  // use the data service, bind to template...
  // or call methods on someDataService to send a request to server
}

function SecondController(someDataService) {
  // has a reference to the same instance of the service
  // so if the service updates state for example, this controller knows about it
}

Another way is emitting an event on scope:

function FirstController($scope) {
  $scope.$on('someEvent', function(event, args) {});
  // another controller or even directive
}

function SecondController($scope) {
  $scope.$emit('someEvent', args);
}

In both cases, you can communicate with any directive as well...

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4  
Hia, The first example would require the web page to be aware of all the services in the stack. Which feels like a bad smell (?). As with the second, wouldn't the web page need to provide the $scope argument? –  BanksySan Mar 12 '12 at 17:02
16  
What? Why? All controllers are injected by Angular's DI. –  Vojta Mar 12 '12 at 19:43
10  
-1 This answer states that you CAN use services or events, but doesn't show how. –  Josh Noe Jul 20 '13 at 22:21
4  
@JoshNoe in 1/ you have two controllers (or more) and they both get one identical/shared service. Then, you have multiple ways how to communicate, some of them you mentioned. I would decide based on your specific use case. You can put the shared logic/state into the service and both controllers only delegate to that service or even export the service to the template. Of course, the service can also fire events... –  Vojta Aug 22 '13 at 19:14
3  
Coming to this late: you guys do know you are arguing with THE Vojta from Google who works on AngularJS, right? :) –  Suman Mar 20 at 20:54
show 6 more comments

See this fiddle: http://jsfiddle.net/simpulton/XqDxG/

Also watch the following video: Communicating Between Controllers

Html:

<div ng-controller="ControllerZero">
  <input ng-model="message" >
  <button ng-click="handleClick(message);">LOG</button>
</div>

<div ng-controller="ControllerOne">
  <input ng-model="message" >
</div>

<div ng-controller="ControllerTwo">
  <input ng-model="message" >
</div>

javascript:

var myModule = angular.module('myModule', []);
myModule.factory('mySharedService', function($rootScope) {
  var sharedService = {};

  sharedService.message = '';

  sharedService.prepForBroadcast = function(msg) {
    this.message = msg;
    this.broadcastItem();
  };

  sharedService.broadcastItem = function() {
    $rootScope.$broadcast('handleBroadcast');
  };

  return sharedService;
});

function ControllerZero($scope, sharedService) {
  $scope.handleClick = function(msg) {
    sharedService.prepForBroadcast(msg);
  };

  $scope.$on('handleBroadcast', function() {
    $scope.message = sharedService.message;
  });        
}

function ControllerOne($scope, sharedService) {
  $scope.$on('handleBroadcast', function() {
    $scope.message = 'ONE: ' + sharedService.message;
  });        
}

function ControllerTwo($scope, sharedService) {
  $scope.$on('handleBroadcast', function() {
    $scope.message = 'TWO: ' + sharedService.message;
  });
}

ControllerZero.$inject = ['$scope', 'mySharedService'];        

ControllerOne.$inject = ['$scope', 'mySharedService'];

ControllerTwo.$inject = ['$scope', 'mySharedService'];
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7  
The above fiddle and video share a service. Here is a fiddle that uses $scope.$emit: jsfiddle.net/VxafF –  Mark Rajcok Aug 12 '12 at 1:32
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Here is a one-page example of two controllers sharing service data:

<!doctype html>
<html ng-app="project">
<head>
    <title>Angular: Service example</title>
    <script src="http://code.angularjs.org/angular-1.0.1.js"></script>
    <script>
var projectModule = angular.module('project',[]);

projectModule.factory('theService', function() {  
    return {
        thing : {
            x : 100
        }
    };
});

function FirstCtrl($scope, theService) {
    $scope.thing = theService.thing;
    $scope.name = "First Controller";
}

function SecondCtrl($scope, theService) {   
    $scope.someThing = theService.thing; 
    $scope.name = "Second Controller!";
}
    </script>
</head>
<body>  
    <div ng-controller="FirstCtrl">
        <h2>{{name}}</h2>
        <input ng-model="thing.x"/>         
    </div>

    <div ng-controller="SecondCtrl">
        <h2>{{name}}</h2>
        <input ng-model="someThing.x"/>             
    </div>
</body>
</html>

Also here: https://gist.github.com/3595424

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And if theService updates thing.x, then that change automatically propageates to the <input>s in FirstCtrl and SecondCtrl, right? And one can also change thing.x directly via any of the two <input>s (right?). –  KajMagnus Nov 22 '12 at 6:19
3  
Yes. All Angular services are application singletons, which means there is only one instance of theService. Reference: docs.angularjs.org/guide/dev_guide.services.creating_services –  exclsr Mar 19 '13 at 23:20
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Two more fiddles: (Non service approach)

1) For Parent- Child controller - Using $scope of parent controller to emit/broadcast events. http://jsfiddle.net/laan_sachin/jnj6y/

2) Using $rootScope across non-related controllers. http://jsfiddle.net/VxafF/

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2nd link is perfect... Thanks :) –  Aamir Shah Feb 20 '13 at 4:29
    
What reason for all this complexity with events ? Why not do something like this ? jsfiddle.net/jnj6y/32 –  Dfr Jun 6 '13 at 18:50
    
It depends on what kind of Parent Child relationship right. It might be a DOM heirarchy, it that case events would allow you to decouple things. –  DarkKnight Jun 21 '13 at 6:14
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Actually using emit and broadcast is inefficient because the event bubbles up and down the scope hierarchy which can easily degrade into performance bottlement for a complex application.

I would suggest to use a service. Here is how I recently implemented it in one of my projects - https://gist.github.com/3384419.

Basic idea - register a pubsub/event bus as a service. Then inject that eventbus where ever you need to subscribe or publish events/topics.

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Great site for angular videos http://www.egghead.io/

One of the tutorials is Sharing Data Between Controllers

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1  
links to offsite resources with no code are not what SO is about. –  DrCord Jan 18 at 16:02
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I also know of this way.

angular.element($('#__userProfile')).scope().close();

But I don't use it too much, because I don't like to use jQuery selectors in angular code.

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There is a method not dependent on services, $broadcast or $emit. It's not suitable in all cases, but if you have 2 related controllers that can be abstracted into directives, then you can use the require option in the directive definition. This is most likely how ngModel and ngForm communicate. You can use this to communicate between directive controllers that are either nested, or on the same element.

For a parent/child situation, the use would be as follows:

<div parent-directive>
  <div inner-directive></div>
</div>

And the main points to get it working: On the parent directive, with the methods to be called, you should define them on this (not on $scope):

controller: function($scope) {
  this.publicMethodOnParentDirective = function() {
    // Do something
  }
}

On the child directive definition, you can use the require option so the parent controller is passed to the link function (so you can then call functions on it from the scope of the child directive.

require: '^parentDirective',
template: '<span ng-click="onClick()">Click on this to call parent directive</span>',
link: function link(scope, iElement, iAttrs, parentController) {
  scope.onClick = function() {
    parentController.publicMethodOnParentDirective();
  }
}

The above can be seen at http://plnkr.co/edit/poeq460VmQER8Gl9w8Oz?p=preview

A sibling directive is used similarly, but both directives on the same element:

<div directive1 directive2>
</div>

Used by creating a method on directive1:

controller: function($scope) {
  this.publicMethod = function() {
    // Do something
  }
}

And in directive2 this can be called by using the require option which results in the siblingController being passed to the link function:

require: 'directive1',
template: '<span ng-click="onClick()">Click on this to call sibling directive1</span>',
link: function link(scope, iElement, iAttrs, siblingController) {
  scope.onClick = function() {
    siblingController.publicMethod();
  }
}

This can be seen at http://plnkr.co/edit/MUD2snf9zvadfnDXq85w?p=preview .

The uses of this?

  • Parent: Any case where child elements need to "register" themselves with a parent. Much like the relationship between ngModel and ngForm. These can add certain behaviour that can affects models. You might have something purely DOM based as well, where a parent element needs to manage the positions of certain children, say to manage or react to scrolling.

  • Sibling: allowing a directive to have its behaviour modified. ngModel is the classic case, to add parsers / validation to ngModel use on inputs.

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Following is a publish-subscribe approach that is irrespective of Angular JS.

Search Param Controller

//Note: Multiple entities publish the same event
regionButtonClicked: function () 
{
        EM.fireEvent('onSearchParamSelectedEvent', 'region');
},

plantButtonClicked: function () 
{
        EM.fireEvent('onSearchParamSelectedEvent', 'plant');
},

Search Choices Controller

//Note: It subscribes for the 'onSearchParamSelectedEvent' published by the Search Param Controller
localSubscribe: function () {
        EM.on('onSearchParamSelectedEvent', this.loadChoicesView, this);

});


loadChoicesView: function (e) {

        //Get the entity name from eData attribute which was set in the event manager
        var entity = $(e.target).attr('eData');

        console.log(entity);

        currentSelectedEntity = entity;
        if (entity == 'region') {
            $('.getvalue').hide();
            this.loadRegionsView();
            this.collapseEntities();
        }
        else if (entity == 'plant') {
            $('.getvalue').hide();
            this.loadPlantsView();
            this.collapseEntities();
        }


});

Event Manager

myBase.EventManager = {

    eventArray:new Array(),


    on: function(event, handler, exchangeId) {
        var idArray;
        if (this.eventArray[event] == null) {
            idArray = new Array();
        } else { 
            idArray = this.eventArray[event];
        }
        idArray.push(exchangeId);
        this.eventArray[event] = idArray;

        //Binding using jQuery
        $(exchangeId).bind(event, handler);
    },

    un: function(event, handler, exchangeId) {

        if (this.eventArray[event] != null) {
            var idArray = this.eventArray[event];
            idArray.pop(exchangeId);
            this.eventArray[event] = idArray;

            $(exchangeId).unbind(event, handler);
        }
    },

    fireEvent: function(event, info) {
        var ids = this.eventArray[event];

        for (idindex = 0; idindex < ids.length; idindex++) {
            if (ids[idindex]) {

                //Add attribute eData
                $(ids[idindex]).attr('eData', info);
                $(ids[idindex]).trigger(event);
            }
        }
    }
};

Global

var EM = myBase.EventManager;
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