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I am using sass and found problem. This is an example of what I am trying to do:

.message-error {
    background-color: red;

    p& {
        background-color: yellow
     }
  }

Expected css:

.message-error {
    background-color: red;
}
p.message-error {
    background-color: yellow ;
}

The idea: all elements with .message-error will be red, expect if it is p.message-error. This is not real-life situation, just to show an example.

SASS is not able to compile this, I even tried string concatenation. Is there some plugin that will do exactly the same?

NOTE: I know I can put another css definition like

p.message-error{....}

under, but I would like to avoid that and use one place for all .message-error definitions.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Like you said: this is not a real-life situation. Whether you're using CSS or Sass, it's better to do what you know to do. There's no reason to do what you're proposing. If there is, please clarify. –  maxbeatty Feb 17 '12 at 7:00
    
It doesn't escape from real-life too much: what I wanted is to have different layout if message-error is either <p> or <ul>. Example: for <p> element, box would have some background-url image at left side (check Constellation admin template). But if it is <ul>, no sprites. –  Zeljko Feb 17 '12 at 18:20
    
Don't know about sass. But in normal CSS if u want "all elements with .message-error will be red, expect if it is p.message-error" from which I assume that the p.message-error does not need to be yellow either, than we could use the negation pseudo-class selector ".message-error:not(p.message-error)" - Not sure about this. –  Jawad Feb 19 '12 at 22:05

7 Answers 7

Nathan Weizenbaum (the main developer of Sass) says it will never be supported:

Currently, & is syntactically the same as an element selector, so it can't appear alongside one. I think this helps clarify where it can be used; for example, foo&bar would never be a valid selector (or would perhaps be equivalent to foo& bar or foo &bar). I don't think this use case is strong enough to warrant changing that.

Source: #282 – Element.parent selector

To my knowledge, there is no possible workaround.

share|improve this answer
    
I found that one too. In fact, it was supported in older version and is supported by Stylus (which I would use but don't know how to install). That's why I was looking for some patch, hack or so. –  Zeljko Feb 21 '12 at 0:48

The best thing to do would be probably this (assuming you have a little more in your .message-error class than just background color.

.message-error {
  background-color: red;
}

p.message-error {
  @extend .message-error;
  background-color: yellow
}

This approach doesn't offer that close grouping, but you can just keep them close to each other.

share|improve this answer

I think if you want to keep them grouped by parent selector, you might need to add a common parent:

body {
    & .message-error {background-color: red;}
    & p.message-error {background-color: yellow}
}

Of course, body could be replaced with some other common parent, such as #Content or another div name that will contain all the error messages.

UPDATE (Another Idea)

If you leverage @for and lists then it seems like this should work (what I don't know for sure is if the list will allow the . (period).

@for $i from 1 to 3 {
  nth(. p. ul., #{$i})message-error {
    background-color: nth(red yellow cyan, #{$i}));
  }
}

Should compile to something like:

.message-error {
   background-color: red;}
p.message-error {
   background-color: yellow;}
ul.message-error {
   background-color: cyan;}
share|improve this answer
    
I want them nested, not grouped near-by :) –  Zeljko Feb 23 '12 at 18:47
    
@Zeljko--I came up with another possible solution. I don't know if it meets your needs, but could be a compact way of writing it. –  ScottS Feb 23 '12 at 20:49
    
Thanks, but I really need as I asked in my first post. –  Zeljko Feb 24 '12 at 23:12

This cheat might work

 {
     $and: .message-error;
     #{$and} {
        background-color: red;
     }

     p#{$and} {
        background-color: yellow
     }
  }

You may even be able to use $& as your variable name but I'm not 100% sure it won't throw an error.

And SASS has inbuilt scoping, which removes having to worry about the value of $and leaking out to the rest of your stylesheet

Variables are only available within the level of nested selectors where they’re defined. If they’re defined outside of any nested selectors, they’re available everywhere.

share|improve this answer
    
I had thought about something like this too, but I believe the output of the above (assuming the interpolation works as expected) would actually be .message-error p.message-error {...} whereas with the original attempted use by Zeljko of the parent selector & (had it worked like he wanted) it would not nest, and produce p.message-error {...}. I don't know this for sure, as I am not a SASS expert, but from reading the documentation, it seems I've understood correctly what the output would be for your solution. –  ScottS Feb 23 '12 at 10:23
    
oh yeah... well spotted. I've edited to something else that might work, though less tidy –  wheresrhys Feb 23 '12 at 10:34
    
Thanks guys, but this looks worse than p.message-error{} under .message-error{}. And it is still not nested as I need. I think I will either learn Stylus or create a ticket for SASS. –  Zeljko Feb 23 '12 at 18:49
    
So two things here. Correct me if I am wrong, but I don't believe the brackets wrapping without a selector will work. Also you need to place quotes around your class name. –  Adam Youngers Dec 2 '14 at 19:22

@Zeljko It is no possible to do what you want via SASS.

See Nex3 comment: https://github.com/nex3/sass/issues/286#issuecomment-7496412

The key is the space before the '&':

.message-error {
    background-color: red;

    p & {
        background-color: yellow
     }
  }

instead of:

.message-error {
    background-color: red;

    p& {
        background-color: yellow
     }
  }
share|improve this answer
    
Adding a space will make the output p .message-error, I think the OP is looking for p.message-error (no space); while your suggestion works, I don't think it's a solution in this particular case. –  mhulse Oct 5 '13 at 23:32

As of Sass 3.4, this is now supported. The syntax looks like this:

.message-error {
    background-color: red;

    @at-root p#{&} {
        background-color: yellow
    }
}

Note the @at-root directive and the interpolation syntax on the ampersand. Failure to include the @at-root directive will result in a selector like .message-error p.message-error rather than p.message-error.

share|improve this answer
    
@at-root is a cool new feature, but it fails miserably when nested within another level of selectors. Though it might work in Zeljko's case. sassmeister.com/gist/bf8492e469d91740194b –  Adam Youngers Dec 2 '14 at 19:47
    
@at-root suffers the same problem that .me {p & {}} suffers in that it jumps all the way up to the root. In my case I use page specific wrapping classes to namespace the css where using either of these will fail. –  Adam Youngers Dec 2 '14 at 19:58

I have ran into this before as well. Bootstrap 3 handles this using a parent selector hack. I've tweaked it slightly for my own purposes...

@mixin message-error() {
  $class: '.message-error';
  #{$class} {
    background-color: red;
  }
  p#{$class} {
    background-color: yellow;
  }
}
@include message-error();

wheresrhys uses a similar approach above, but with some sass errors. The code above allows you to manage it as one block and collapse it in your editor. Nesting the variable also makes it local so you can reuse $class for all instances where you need to apply this hack. See below for a working sample...

http://sassmeister.com/gist/318dce458a9eb3991b13

share|improve this answer
    
If a previous answer works after you fix a minor typo, the appropriate action is to fix the typo, not post an entirely new answer. –  cimmanon Dec 2 '14 at 19:27
    
I thought the approach different enough to share. –  Adam Youngers Dec 2 '14 at 19:42

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