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I have a simple model for a contract:

public class Contract
{
    public int Number { get; set; }
    public DateTime DateSigned { get; set; }
}

When creating a new contract I'd like to automatically suggest the next available number. I get it from the database in my controller's Create action.

public Create()
{
    ViewBag.SuggestNum = /* ... */;
    return View();
}

In my View I have an EditorFor my Number and my DateSigned:

@Html.EditorFor( m => m.DateSigned )
@Html.EditorFor( m => m.Number )

I've tried both of these but they seem to have no effect whatsoever on the resulting html:

@Html.EditorFor( m => m.Number, new { @value = ViewBag.SuggestNum.ToString() } ) 
@Html.EditorFor( m => m.Number, new { @Value = ViewBag.SuggestNum.ToString() } )

Another option is to construct a Contract object in my controller but then my non-nullable DateTime property's editor defaults to 01.01.0001 instead of being empty:

public Create()
{
    var SuggestNum = /* ... */;

    // The new object has a DateSigned property with the default value of 01.01.0001
    return View( new Contract() { Number = SuggestNum }); 
}

So this doesn't work either.

Any ideas how to set the value of my Number property's editor but not my DateSigned's?

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You could make the DateSigned property a Nullable<DateTime>:

public class Contract
{
    public int Number { get; set; }

    [Required]
    public DateTime? DateSigned { get; set; }
}

and then in your controller:

public ActionResult Create()
{
    var suggestNum = ... fetch from db
    return View( new Contract() { Number = suggestNum }); 
}

and in your view:

@Html.EditorFor( m => m.DateSigned )
@Html.EditorFor( m => m.Number )
share|improve this answer
    
But the domain model doesn't allow contracts with no signing date. DateSigned is strictly required. –  Alex Feb 15 '12 at 14:00
1  
@Alex, you never pass a domain model to your views anyway. You should always be using view models which are classes that you specifically design to meet the requirements of your view. You could also decorate it with the [Required] attribute to validate that the user entered some value. I have updated my answer to include this attribute on the view model. You will notice that I insist very much on the word view model. I am deliberately not using the word model. –  Darin Dimitrov Feb 15 '12 at 14:02
    
Well, that's not the answer I was hoping for, since I'd like to avoid this extra layer between the business logic and the view where possible. So I accept your answer but I'm still very much interested in other ways to solve the problem that don't require using a different view model. –  Alex Feb 15 '12 at 14:17

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