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I have a number ("double") from int/int (such as 10/3).

What's the best way to Approximation by Excess and convert it to int on C#?

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What is 'Approximation by Excess' ? – An Old Fortran Hacker Feb 15 '12 at 15:23
    
Uhm...maybe I don't know how to call it in english? :) Well, if you have 0.2->1; 0.8->1...and so on..."round" to the next int? – markzzz Feb 15 '12 at 15:29
4  
Do you mean (int)Math.Ceiling(x)? – CodesInChaos Feb 15 '12 at 15:38
1  
or in English "Round Up"? – Jodrell Feb 15 '12 at 15:42
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Should -1.5 round to -1 or -2? – Jodrell Feb 15 '12 at 15:47
up vote 17 down vote accepted

Are you asking about System.Math.Ceiling?

Math.Ceiling(0.2) == 1
Math.Ceiling(0.8) == 1
Math.Ceiling(2.6) == 3
Math.Ceiling(-1.4) == -1
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7  
Math.Ceiling(-1.4)==-2 -- what language is that ? Tell me it's name so that I can shun it like the plague. – High Performance Mark Feb 15 '12 at 15:42
    
Oops, I screwed that up. I looked it up, but I misread the example. – Doug McClean Feb 15 '12 at 15:44
int scaled = Math.Ceiling( (double) 10 / 3 );
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3  
I think you need to cast it for this to work.. i.e. int scaled = (int)Math.Ceiling( (double 10 / 3 ); – Mark Rhodes Mar 4 '14 at 9:58

Consider 2.42 , you can say it's 242/100 btw you can simplify it to 121/50 .

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I think you are kidding me? Well... – markzzz Feb 15 '12 at 15:38
1  
your question was not clear! I think you mean Math.Ceiling – mrbm Feb 15 '12 at 15:44

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