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I'm sorry in advance if this question is flawed. I'm pretty new to databases(I have set them up but not used them much in my development learning).

BackGround: I have a process that generates alot of test data, its basically a hashtable with several hundred million records every day(but at the end of the day I can delete those records). Generating the data takes too long on one machine so I'm splitting the process up over several servers, which basically need to look up a database(or currently hashtable) and if it exists do some work and if it doesn't exist then add it. I think(so far) my needs is a database that can handle the large amount of writes in a consistent way(i.e. updates should be avail. instantly) and the database should be able to effectically transfer this table over the network to other worker nodes(after the table is created another job runs that is based on it, but I don't think a single server server a 10+ gig table to several servers is efficent so I was thinking it needs to be distributed).

Problem/Question: If I use a NoSql solution, like Hbase(which I have a bit of experience setting up), will my application logic work? If I have 2 servers writing to a distributed database, is there any chance that server1 added an entry but when server2 looks it up it can't find it because it hasn't replicated though the cluster yet? Also, is there a better way to do what I'm trying to do? Would a single server(I also am considering just using mysql) with no distribution work better(I was avoiding it because I wanted a solution that if was too slow I could simply add more worker servers to write to a database, I'm not sure if my performance returns would diminish if I add 100 workers to write to a single server)?

Any tips or suggestions would be great.

Thanks!

Update: I just realized that facebook's messaging infrastructure uses hbase. If it was not consistent that I would be getting crazy delays when messaging my friends. So how does hbase stay consistent(or is it really not consistent and facebook is so fast that it seems that way)?

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2 Answers 2

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If I have 2 servers writing to a distributed database, is there any chance that server1 added an entry but when server2 looks it up it can't find it because it hasn't replicated though the cluster yet?

HBase, in particular, has guaranteed consistency. This means that once a write operation has been completed, the data written will be available to all clients. This write operation, however, does not happen instantly, so that must be taken into account.

Other NoSQL database engines, such as Cassandra, support what is called "eventual consistency", which trades absolute consistency for write speed. This means that a piece of data written to the cluster will EVENTUALLY be consistent across nodes, but it may take some time -- typically this period of time is very short. More information on such a trade-off can be found here.

It is my supposition that you would prefer the guaranteed consistency of HBase.

Also, is there a better way to do what I'm trying to do?

This depends on what your records are going to look like. Could you provide more information on the data you'll be storing? If your data fields cater to a document model -- you typically require all of the fields when accessing data for a given key -- then you could look into various document based data stores, such as MongoDB. MongoDB offers various levels of consistency (the default, rather conveniently, is to guarantee consistency like HBase).

If you will often times be looking for some subset of the fields stored per each key, then HBase will help minimize the amount of data you're sending over the network by allowing you to specify which columns you wish to receive from a scan or get.

Would a single server... with no distribution work better(I was avoiding it because I wanted a solution that if was too slow I could simply add more worker servers to write to a database, I'm not sure if my performance returns would diminish if I add 100 workers to write to a single server)?

The distributed database engines will certainly perform better under concurrent reads/writes. Due to the aforementioned properties, HBase is considered to be strong in read heavy scenarios (writes aren't live until they are syndicated) while Cassandra and other eventually consistent database engines are considered to be strong in write heavy scenarios (though Cassandra's latest release has seen significant performance gains in reading).

A traditional database running on a single server will suffer when the read/write load increases, as it will have to queue incoming connections as well as disk operations once they have reached their perspective rate limits. I believe HBase (or MongoDB, should you decide a document store could work for you) would suit your needs for consistency the best.

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Wow thank you for the great answer! My data is a simple boolean(true/false) hash table but very large, it crashes my single server after exceeding 12 gigs of memory. Could you please expand on "This write operation, however, does not happen instantly, so that must be taken into account." Is there any specific number or a way of finding out that number? Because if a node looks up a record and its not in the database it creates it(but sets bool to false), but if it already exists it then it sets it to true, so not finding the record in time could have issues for my process. –  Lostsoul Feb 15 '12 at 20:51
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That timing is dependent on the configuration of your cluster. The more nodes you have and the more replication (redundant copies of a data item) you require (both of these are configurable), the longer it will take. I can tell you that, on average, the cluster I work with (with replication on three nodes) handles puts to the database within the range of 3-20 milliseconds. If you need something faster than that, you might want to consider an in-memory solution, such as memchached or, slightly slower but persistent (written to the disk), MemcacheDB. –  fredugolon Feb 15 '12 at 21:28
    
Thank you! Great answer. One last question, what happens if I server1 writes data 1=false and server2 writes data 1:true but it was within the replication time. Does hbase kick back an error or update with the most recent update? Would this kind of even be in the log file? –  Lostsoul Feb 15 '12 at 21:34
    
HBase also has configurable cell versioning (a cell is an individual data item in a column). Cells are versioned by their timestamps and, by default, the server will always return the value with the latest timestamp (though you can configure this in your requests). It is my supposition that, in this instance, you would get two versions of the same cell with different timestamps and different values. To solve this, HBase has a RowLock object that would allow you to lock a given row key to prevent concurrent writes. –  fredugolon Feb 15 '12 at 21:54
    
well I might not even need to..this might work for me better. If I can scan for all cells that have two versions then I can investigate it further. Thank you so much, you have greatly helped me. I noticed this is your first answer, your so knowledgable I hope you continue to participate! Thanks a million! –  Lostsoul Feb 15 '12 at 22:02

Just to add to the previous answer:

Note that Cassandra supports tunable consistency.

For each read and write, you can choose the consistency level you want, i.e. do a read/write to any node (eventual consistency) or all nodes (full consistency), or a 'quorum' of nodes (full consistency iff both read and write are made at quorum level). See http://wiki.apache.org/cassandra/API

The propagation delay can cause issues, as you suggest. One solution is to increase the consistency level.

Another approach, for the special case where you know a value should be available, is to read at a low consistency level, and retry if the value is 'missing'. Then you only take a performance hit for the small number of cases where the data hasn't propagated.

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