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There is two different scenarios I'm after:

  1. You have a shared_ptr
  2. You have a unique_ptr

The answer might be the same though.

Consider a method, which uses a pointer but does not assume ownership:

void use_pointer(T ptr)
{
    ptr->act();
}

Should T be

  • my_type * (raw pointer)
  • const shared_ptr<my_type> & (sending const ref, if using shared_ptr)
  • const unique_ptr<my_type> & (sending const ref, if using unique_ptr)
  • weak_ptr<my_type> (constructing weak_ptr for method call)

Something else? Thanks!

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5 Answers 5

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If you do not assume ownership, then preferably accept a reference to the pointee. If you want to express optionality, you can use a raw pointer, or you can use e.g. boost::optional<U&> (where U is the pointee type).

Functions that do no assume ownership should almost never accept a smart pointer. There is in general nothing useful for the callee in a smart pointer interface other than means of getting to the pointee. So pass that instead.

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2  
Conveniently, if you accept a reference, the calling syntax is the same for all pointer types: use_pointer(*ptr) –  Useless Feb 15 '12 at 16:48
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Let the caller decide:

template<typename T>
void use_pointer(const T& ptr)
{
    ptr->act();
}

Works nicely with raw pointers (if the caller has, for example, an array with automatic or static lifetime), shared_ptr, unique_ptr, and also all kinds of iterator types if the caller is passing you one element from a collection.

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This is a good idea, and actually thought of it as soon as I wrote the 'placeholder' T in the question... But accepted the other one since this is a bit cumbersome as a general case type of thing. –  Max Feb 16 '12 at 22:15
    
@Max: I really like Luc's solution too -- but only if the argument is a const reference. –  Ben Voigt Feb 16 '12 at 22:31
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In this case, it should probably be my_type&. If you really have to pass a pointer, then just pass a raw one: since you're using smart pointers in your code, when someone sees a raw one they shouldn't think "oh no, it can leak!" but rather "aha, a non-owning pointer" (that is, assuming they're familiar with idiomatic C++).

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It's impossible to answer the question without knowing why you have a smart pointer (instead of a raw pointer), and without knowing the semantics of the called function, and in particular, why it needs a pointer (rather than call by value or by const reference). As a good starting point, however: if the function takes a class type, use const reference, otherwise, use value. (But is there ever a scenario where you would have a pointer to something that isn't a class type?)

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If the function is going to store the pointer (for example add into a container), use std::shared_ptr, otherwize use std::unique_ptr. If your pointer is already a std::shared_ptr then keep using that.

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