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If I declare an object as follows:

var foo.bar = new Object;

Does that automatically make foo an object? If not and I want both foo and foo.bar to be objects do I need to use the following code:

var foo = new Object;
var foo.bar = new Object;

And if I create these two objects as above, is there a parent/child relationship between them or are they completely separate entities?

I apologize for the simple nature of my question, but I am trying to more fully understand the various ways data can be structured.

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Thanks to all for your answers, especially with respect to the proper literal notation to use. –  WyoBuckeye Feb 15 '12 at 16:06

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If I declare an object as follows:

  var foo.bar = new Object;

Does that automatically make foo an object?

No. It's a syntax error;

SyntaxError: Unexpected token .

If not and I want both foo and foo.bar to be objects do I need to use the following code:

var foo = new Object;
var foo.bar = new Object;

No, that's again a syntax error. You should be using.

var foo = new Object;
foo.bar = new Object;

But it's more common to use object literal syntax these days;

var foo = {
    bar: {

    }
}

And if I create these two objects as above, is there a parent/child relationship between them or are they completely separate entities?

They are completely separate entities. The only link between them is that foo holds a reference to bar. Something else can easily hold a reference to bar;

var baz = foo.bar;
// Now baz and foo.bar are both pointing to the same object

alert(baz === foo.bar); // true;
baz.attr = 1;
alert(baz.attr); // 1
alert(foo.bar.attr); // 1

delete foo.bar; // delete foo's reference to bar
alert(baz.attr); // still shows 1
alert(foo.bar.attr); // error, because we deleted `bar`.

Try it yourself... http://jsfiddle.net/AMXLE/1

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var foo.bar = new Object;

That would throw a SyntaxError; the . character is not allowed in JavaScript variable names. This would work, though:

var foobar = new Object;

var foo = new Object; var foo.bar = new Object;

That won’t work for the same reason as before. Use this instead:

// using the `Object` constructor
var foo = new Object;
foo.bar = new Object;

// or just use an object literal:
var foo = {
  'bar': {}
};

And if I create these two objects as above, is there a parent/child relationship between them or are they completely separate entities?

Both bar and foo are objects, but bar is a property of foo.

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The way I like to see it, is that objects in Javascript are exactly the same as associative arrays (aka hashtables, aka dictionaries), where each key is a string, and each value can be of any type, including function. So your code is EXACTLY the same as:

var foo = {};
foo["bar"] = {};

Or even:

var foo = {"bar": {}};
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That first example will cause an error, because foo has not previously been defined, but what you can do, is use object literals:

var foo = { bar: new Object() };

Or even:

var foo = { bar: {} };

In terms of your last question, bar becomes a property of foo.

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in fact, literals are more preferable –  Molecular Man Feb 15 '12 at 15:54
2  
It won’t error because foo has not been defined (in fact, it has been defined in OP’s example); it will throw a SyntaxError because of the . character which is invalid in a JavaScript variable name. –  Mathias Bynens Feb 15 '12 at 15:54
    
should simply be var foo = {bar:{}}; because {} is the same as new Object(). –  zzzzBov Feb 15 '12 at 15:55

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