Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I'm trying to create a script that will launch autossh on boot through an init script, but I can't get it to work. I would like to see that it logs all of its actions, since it was not working properly, but that isn't going that well ether. Since I'm not a pro in bash I hope my code isn't horribly embarrassing.

#!/bin/sh
#
# by Patrick van der Leer <pat.vdleer@gmail.com>
# released under GPL, version 2 or later

PATH=/sbin:/bin:/usr/sbin:/usr/bin
DAEMON="/usr/bin/autossh"
DESC="Autossh job"
PIDFOLDER="/var/run/autossh"
PIDFOLDERSSH="$PIDFOLDER/ssh"
REMOTE_USER=""
REMOTE_ADDR=""
LOGFILE="/var/log/autossh.log"

if [ ! -d $PIDFOLDER ] ; then
    mkdir -p $PIDFOLDER
fi

if [ ! -d $PIDFOLDERSSH ] ; then
    mkdir -p $PIDFOLDERSSH
fi

test -f $DAEMON || exit 0

. /lib/lsb/init-functions

PIDFILE="$PIDFOLDER/$REMOTE_USER-$REMOTE_ADDR.pid"
PIDFILESSH="$PIDFOLDERSSH/$REMOTE_USER-$REMOTE_ADDR.pid"

is_running() {
    if [ -f $PIDFILE ]; then
        PID=`cat $PIDFILE`
        if [ -n "$PID" ]; then
            return 0
        else
            return 1
        fi
    else
        return 1
    fi
}

start_autossh() {
    if ! is_running; then
        echo "Starting $DESC"
        export AUTOSSH_FIRST_POLL=10
        export AUTOSSH_POLL=60
        export AUTOSSH_PIDFILE=$PIDFILESSH
        start-stop-daemon --start --make-pidfile --pidfile $PIDFILE --exec $DAEMON -- -M 29000 -i /root/.ssh/id_rsa -X -C -R 2222:localhost:22 $REMOTE_USER@$REMOTE_ADDR >> $LOGFILE 2>&1 &
        sleep 1;
        if ! is_running; then
            echo "$DESC: running @ pid $PID"
        else
            echo 'Something went wrong';
        fi
    else
        echo "$DESC: already running (pid $PID)"
    fi
}

stop_autossh() {
    if is_running; then
        echo "Stopping $DESC"
        start-stop-daemon --stop --pidfile $PIDFILE --signal 15
        if [ -f $PIDSSHFILE ]; then
            PIDSSH=`cat $PIDFILESSH`
            kill $PIDSSH
            rm -f $PIDFILESSH
        fi
    else
        echo "$DESC: not running"
    fi
    [ -f $PIDFILE ] && rm -f $PIDFILE
}

case "$1" in
    start)
        start_autossh
    ;;
    stop)
        stop_autossh
    ;;
    force-reload|restart)
        stop_autossh
        start_autossh
    ;;
    status)
        if is_running; then
            echo "$DESC: running (pid $PID)"
            exit 0
        else
            echo "$DESC: not running"
            [ -f $PIDFILE ] && exit 1 || exit 3
        fi
    ;;
    log)
        if [ -f $LOGIFLE ]; then
            tail $LOGFILE
        else
            echo "log file '$LOGFILE' does't exist"
        fi
    ;;
    *)
        echo "Usage: $0 {start|stop|restart|force-reload|status|log}"
        exit 3
    ;;
esac

exit 0
share|improve this question
1  
bash and /bin/sh are two things that may be the same, but may be totally different. On most Debian systems, /bin/sh is dash these days. It is faster, but lacks most of the features bash has in addition to the POSIX standard shell. Often people use bash (or zsh, it has even more features) for interactive use, but write scripts for POSIX shell and use some of the faster implementations like dash to run them. – Jan Hudec Feb 15 '12 at 16:06
1  
per JanHudec's comment, you need to find out if your /bin/sh really is bash, dash, OR the original /bin/sh, the Bourne shell (if you are using AIX, Solaris, HP and other old-line Unix, as opposed to Linux, then it is very likely Bourne, with other cavets you'll need to understand). Unless you need Bourne shell compatibility, use $(cat $PIDFILE) which is modern and nestable instead of cat $PIDFILE which is deprecated since at least 1995. Otherwise, a very nice bit of code and formatted the way the code-gods intended! ;-) Good luck. – shellter Feb 15 '12 at 16:44
    
Thanks /bin/sh is a symlink to dash :) – PvdL Feb 15 '12 at 16:51

Shell will print all statements just before it executes them if you set the x option. Either:

  • Run the script as /bin/sh -x script.
  • Change the #! line to #!/bin/sh -x.
  • Do set -x at the beginning of the script.

Obviously the first will set it for that one run, the other two will set it for each run.


Checking man page of start-stop-daemon(8) it seems you are using it wrong. You should not background start-stop-daemon with &, you should instead tell start-stop-daemon to background the executed process using --background option. The documentation for --make-pidfile even says it should not be expected to work except together with --background option.

You also should be redirecting the start-stop-dameon's output, it's only output of the process you need redirected. start-stop-daemon will redirect it to /dev/null IIRC, but I don't see a way to override this. You might have to create a wrapper that will exec it with appropriate redirections and use that in --startas option, unless you manage to tell autossh to log into a file directly.

share|improve this answer
    
in that case the script echo's: + start-stop-daemon --start --make-pidfile --pidfile /var/run/autossh/user-xxx.nl.pid --exec /usr/bin/autossh -- -M 29000 -i /root/.ssh/id_rsa -X -C -R 2222:localhost:22 user@xxx.nl So without the >> to the logfile, the logfile does contain the motd of the remote server, no errors since the ssh sessions isn't running seconds after starting. I know the script contains 2>&1 but I can't find the errors anywhere. – PvdL Feb 15 '12 at 17:00
    
@junke1990: The script seems to be running the start-stop-daemon fine, but the daemon itself is failing. The fact, that the logfile contains remote server's motd suggests that the ssh even starts, but than something goes wrong. Hm... looking at the man page I suspect you are using the start-stop-daemon wrong. – Jan Hudec Feb 16 '12 at 8:19
    
Autsossh can run as a daemon (param -f) but is unable to specify a pid, that's why I was using the start-stop-daemon. I've looked at the rest of the init script but most of the scripts are using the daemon the same way I am. – PvdL Feb 16 '12 at 14:43
    
@junke1990: But start-stop-daemon does not know the PID if the process is backgrounding itself (the backgrounded process is different from the one that was launched), so you have to have start-stop-daemon background it instead. – Jan Hudec Feb 17 '12 at 8:21

The script below runs one and only one autossh process when invoked.

#!/bin/sh
### BEGIN INIT INFO
# Provides:          skeleton
# Required-Start:    $network $remote_fs $syslog
# Required-Stop:     $network $remote_fs $syslog
# Default-Start:     2 3 4 5
# Default-Stop:      0 1 6
# Short-Description: autosshtun
# Description:       Used to launch SSH tunnel with autossh
### END INIT INFO

# Author: Laurent HUBERT <lau.hub@gmail.com>
#
# Do NOT "set -e"

# PATH should only include /usr/* if it runs after the mountnfs.sh script
PATH=/sbin:/usr/sbin:/bin:/usr/bin
DESC="AUTOSSH Tunnel"
NAME=autosshtun
DAEMON=/usr/lib/autossh/autossh
DAEMON_ARGS=""
PIDFILE=/var/run/$NAME.pid
SCRIPTNAME=/etc/init.d/$NAME

# Exit if the package is not installed
[ -x "$DAEMON" ] || exit 0

# Read configuration variable file if it is present
[ -r /etc/default/$NAME ] && . /etc/default/$NAME

# Load the VERBOSE setting and other rcS variables
. /lib/init/vars.sh

# Define LSB log_* functions.
# Depend on lsb-base (>= 3.2-14) to ensure that this file is present
# and status_of_proc is working.
. /lib/lsb/init-functions

CONN_PORT=22
SSH_TUNNEL_KEY_PATH=/root/.ssh/id-rsa
SSH_USERNAME=user
SSH_SERVER=server.domain.tld
ENTRY_PORT=1122
EXIT_PORT=22

ENV_COMMAND=/usr/bin/env 
ENV_OPTIONS="AUTOSSH_PIDFILE=$PIDFILE"
SSH_COMMAND_OPTIONS="-p $CONN_PORT -i $SSH_TUNNEL_KEY_PATH $SSH_USERNAME@$SSH_SERVER"
OPEN_TUNNEL_OPTIONS="-T -N -R $ENTRY_PORT:localhost:$EXIT_PORT"

AUTOSSH_OPTION="-M 0" 

DAEMON_ARGS="$AUTOSSH_OPTION $SSH_COMMAND_OPTIONS $OPEN_TUNNEL_OPTIONS"

is_running() {
    if [ -f $PIDFILE ]; then
        PID=`cat $PIDFILE`
        if [ -n "$PID" ]; then
            return 0
        else
            return 1
        fi
    else
        return 1
    fi
}
#
# Function that starts the daemon/service
#
do_start()
{
    QUIET="--quiet"
    if ! is_running; then
        start-stop-daemon --background --start $QUIET --name $NAME \
            --exec $ENV_COMMAND -- $ENV_OPTIONS $DAEMON $DAEMON_ARGS
        retval=$?
        sleep 1

        if [ $retval -gt 0 ]; then
            return $retval
        else
            sleep 1
            start-stop-daemon --stop $QUIET --pidfile $PIDFILE \
            --test --exec $DAEMON > /dev/null || return 2
        fi
    else
        return 1
    fi
}

#
# Function that stops the daemon/service
#
do_stop()
{
    # Return
    #   0 if daemon has been stopped
    #   1 if daemon was already stopped
    #   2 if daemon could not be stopped
    #   other if a failure occurred
    start-stop-daemon --stop --quiet --retry=TERM/10/KILL/5 --pidfile $PIDFILE --name $NAME
    RETVAL="$?"
    [ "$RETVAL" = 2 ] && return 2
    # Wait for children to finish too if this is a daemon that forks
    # and if the daemon is only ever run from this initscript.
    # If the above conditions are not satisfied then add some other code
    # that waits for the process to drop all resources that could be
    # needed by services started subsequently.  A last resort is to
    # sleep for some time.
    start-stop-daemon --stop --quiet --oknodo --retry=TERM/10/KILL/5 --exec $DAEMON
    [ "$?" = 2 ] && return 2
    # Many daemons don't delete their pidfiles when they exit.
    rm -f $PIDFILE
    return "$RETVAL"
}


case "$1" in
  start)
    [ "$VERBOSE" != no ] && log_daemon_msg "Starting $DESC" "$NAME"
    do_start
    case "$?" in
        0|1) [ "$VERBOSE" != no ] && log_end_msg 0 ;;
        2) [ "$VERBOSE" != no ] && log_end_msg 1 ;;
    esac
    ;;
  stop)
    [ "$VERBOSE" != no ] && log_daemon_msg "Stopping $DESC" "$NAME"
    do_stop
    case "$?" in
        0|1) [ "$VERBOSE" != no ] && log_end_msg 0 ;;
        2) [ "$VERBOSE" != no ] && log_end_msg 1 ;;
    esac
    ;;
  status)
    status_of_proc "$DAEMON" "$NAME" && exit 0 || exit $?
    ;;
  restart)
    log_daemon_msg "Restarting $DESC" "$NAME"
    do_stop
    case "$?" in
      0|1)
        do_start
        case "$?" in
            0) log_end_msg 0 ;;
            1) log_end_msg 1 ;; # Old process is still running
            *) log_end_msg 1 ;; # Failed to start
        esac
        ;;
      *)
        # Failed to stop
        log_end_msg 1
        ;;
    esac
    ;;
  *)
    echo "Usage: $SCRIPTNAME {start|stop|status|restart}" >&2
    exit 3
    ;;
esac
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.