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I'm trying to get my head around inverse_of and I do not get it.

What does the generated sql look like, if any?

Does the inverse_of option exhibit the same behavior if used with :has_many, :belongs_to, and :has_many_and_belongs_to?

Sorry if this is such a basic question.

I saw this example:

class Player < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :cards, :inverse_of => :player
end

class Card < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :player, :inverse_of => :cards
end
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5 Answers 5

From the documentation, it seems like the :inverse_of option is a method for avoiding SQL queries, not generating them. It's a hint to ActiveRecord to use already loaded data instead of fetching it again through a relationship.

Their example:

class Dungeon < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :traps, :inverse_of => :dungeon
  has_one :evil_wizard, :inverse_of => :dungeon
end

class Trap < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :dungeon, :inverse_of => :traps
end

class EvilWizard < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :dungeon, :inverse_of => :evil_wizard
end

In this case, calling dungeon.traps.first.dungeon should return the original dungeon object instead of loading a new one as would be the case by default.

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5  
Do you understand the comment in the documentation: "for belongs_to associations has_many inverse associations are ignored.". And yet the doc uses that exact example. What am I missing here? –  dynex Feb 16 '12 at 3:41
1  
I'm not entirely sure. inverse_of hasn't really seen a lot of use so it might be a behaviour that's not very well defined. I've tried using it after you pointed out that feature and it hasn't really done anything useful for me. –  tadman Feb 16 '12 at 4:05
36  
This is all very strange to me, because it seems to me that you would always want this behavior by default, and only need to use :inverse_of when the association name can't be inferred. Also the inconsistencies in the definition are bothersome, but it has helped me out in a few cases. Any reason I shouldn't just stick it everywhere? –  Ibrahim Jul 6 '12 at 0:08
14  
@Ibrahim Check this out, it was merged 23 days ago! github.com/rails/rails/pull/9522 –  LaceCard May 30 '13 at 18:28
6  
It makes sense for the inverse of a belongs_to association to be ignored because the child of a record A's parent record is not guaranteed to be record A -- it could be a sibling of Record A. The parent of a child of record A, however, is guaranteed to be record A. –  David Aldridge Jul 17 '13 at 20:50

I think :inverse_of is most useful when you are working with associations that have not yet been persisted. E.g.:

class Project < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :tasks, :inverse_of=>:project
end

class Task < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :project, :inverse_of=>:tasks
end

Now, in the console:

irb> p = Project.new
=> #<Project id: nil, name: nil, ...>
irb> t = p.tasks.build
=> #<Task id: nil, project_id: nil, ...>
irb> t.project
=> #<Project id: nil, name: nil, ...>

Without the :inverse_of arguments, t.project would return nil, because it triggers an sql query and the data isn't stored yet. With the :inverse_of arguments, the data is retrieved from memory.

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I had a problem with accepts_nested_attributes_for. By default, only nested attributes for existing associated objects shows (edit action). If, for example, you'd like to CREATE an object with, say, 3 associated objects, you should have Model.new (new action) and :inverse_of in your models. –  Victor Marconi Oct 22 '14 at 11:11

Just an update for everyone - we just used inverse_of with one of our apps with a has_many :through association


It basically makes the "origin" object available to the "child" object

So if you're using the Rails' example:

class Dungeon < ActiveRecord::Base
  has_many :traps, :inverse_of => :dungeon
  has_one :evil_wizard, :inverse_of => :dungeon
end

class Trap < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :dungeon, :inverse_of => :traps
  validates :id,
      :presence => { :message => "Dungeon ID Required", :unless => :draft? }

  private
  def draft?
      self.dungeon.draft
  end 
end

class EvilWizard < ActiveRecord::Base
  belongs_to :dungeon, :inverse_of => :evil_wizard
end

Using :inverse_of will allow you to access the data object that it's the inverse of, without performing any further SQL queries

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If you have a has_many_through relation between two models, User and Role, and want to validate the connecting model Assignment against non existing or invalid entries with validates_presence of :user_id, :role_id, it is useful. You can still generate a User @user with his association @user.role(params[:role_id]) so that saving the user would not result in a failing validation of the Assignment model.

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