Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have two questions regarding functions in C++: can you dynamically declare a function when passing it as a reference, and is it possible to store functions to use later?

Passing Dynamic Function?

My question may not be worded perfectly clear, but what I mean is in Java you quite often see code that looks like:

button.addActionListener( new ActionListener( ) 
{
    public void actionPerformed( ActionEvent e )
    {
        System.out.println( "..." );
    }
} );

or JavaScript:

$( ".class" ).each( function( )
{
    alert( "..." );
} );

While in C++ you are limited to:

void print( )
{
    std::cout << "..." << std::endl;
}

void func( void ( &f )( ) )
{
    f( );
}

// ...

func( print );

and can not do something like

void func( void ( &f )( ) )
{
    f( );
}

// ...

func( void f( ){ ... } );

Is this just a limitation to C++?

Storing Functions?

Is it at all possible to store similar functions into a container to be called later? An example of the idea (which does not work) is:

std::vector< void( ) > storage;

void callMeLater( void ( &f )( ) )
{
    storage.push_back( f );
}

void popFunction( )
{
    void f( ) = storage.pop_back( );
    f( );
}

These ideas both came to me when working on an Event system, to see if my Timer object could also handle delayed functions as well as event calls. As I have never seen these used in any C++ code, I doubt they are possible but would love to be shown otherwise!

Thank you.

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

With the current standard, it has become very easy:

#include <functional>

void foo (std::function<float(float,float)> bar) {
    std::cout << bar (0.5, 0.75);

    std::function<float(float,float)> frob = bar;
}

Within the angle brackets you declare the output (a single float in this case) and input (two floats).

You could then call it like this:

float perlin_noise_function (float x, float z) { ... }

class PerlinNoiseFunctor : public std::binary_function<float(float,float)>
{...};

int main () {
    // pass function pointer
    foo (perlin_noise);

    // pass functor
    PerlinNoiseFunctor pnf;
    foo (pnf);

    // pass lambda function
    foo ([] (float x, float z) { ... });
}

You could also replace foo like this:

template <typename F>
void foo (F f) ;
share|improve this answer
    
Oh, wow. That is exactly what I was looking for. Thank you for that. –  ssell Feb 15 '12 at 16:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.