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I have this specific case that bring me some doubts: My class A have a one-to-many relationship with B:

A  1----->*  B

Which, as far as I know, makes their related instances belong to the same entity group. I have to retrieve one particular A instance and one of its B, so I search for A and iterate through its B List to find the particular B (always searching by Id). After that, I change one attribute of A and B and commit my changes by merging A. So here are my questions:

  1. Knowing that I must retrieve A and B (because I have to modify both), should I make 2 searches instead of iterating the B List?
  2. Making 2 searches, modifications on B will be persisted if I only persist A?
  3. Will question 1 and 2 have the same answer in this case:
A  1----->*  C  1----->*  B

Complementing the question with some code:

@Entity
public class A
{

    @Id
    @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
    private Key key;

    private int aField;

    @OneToMany(cascade={CascadeType.ALL})
    private List<B> bList;

    //...
}

@Entity
public class B
{
     @Id
     @GeneratedValue(strategy = GenerationType.IDENTITY)
     private Key key;

     private int someBField;

     // no way to get A from here...

     //...
}

public void someService1(Key aKey, Key bKey)
{
     //...

     // Here, I'm sure that bKey is of an entity son of aKey entity (I trust the client)
     A a = entityManager.find(A.class, aKey);
     a.setAField(a.getAField()++);

     for(B b : a.getBList())
          if(b.getKey().equals(bKey))
                b.setSomeBField(b.getSomeBField()++);

     entityManager.merge(a);

     //...
}

public void someService2(Key aKey, Key bKey)
{
     //...

     // Here, I'm sure that bKey is of an entity son of aKey entity (I trust the client)
     A a = entityManager.find(A.class, aKey);
     a.setAField(a.getAField()++);

     B b = entityManager.find(B.class, bKey);
     b.setSomeBField(b.getSomeBField()++);

     entityManager.merge(a);

     //...
}

Well, both someService1 and someService2 do the same thing, if I did everything right. Which one is better?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you know the id (and you say you're searching by id) then just do an em.find for the A, and em.find for the B. Two calls. Sadly the JPA API doesn't have a em.findAll. JDO, on the other hand, does have pm.getObjectsById

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Thank you. You are saying this because it's cheaper than iterate the B List, right? –  Roberto Feb 16 '12 at 11:37
    
Think of the datastore access ... get A, then get List of B entities ... or get A, get B. Likely two datastore accesses with both (look at the log, it tells you (with recent versions of Google plugin)), but the latter is retrieving less information (bandwidth) –  DataNucleus Feb 16 '12 at 13:19
    
I thought it would cost more read operations when iterating over a list (one search for each element in list). –  Roberto Feb 16 '12 at 19:56
    
Depends how GAE manages it ... its a single call ... but a call for many Entity object. The way I suggest it is a call for one Entity, so is never going to cost more –  DataNucleus Feb 17 '12 at 5:24

If I understood correctly you don't have to iterate through anything, but instead use the filter() on any Query you like. Examples (Python):

query.filter('height >', 42).filter('city = ', 'Seattle')

query.filter('user = ', users.get_current_user())

If you're using Java the you'll have use addFilter on your queries (more info).

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Sorry, forgot to say I use Java & JPA. –  Roberto Feb 15 '12 at 16:42
    
@Roberto I updated my answer with some links regarding Java. –  Lipis Feb 15 '12 at 16:54
    
I don't get it, how does filter usage translate into number of searches or datastore reads? How can I retrieve both entity AND ancestor using this? Please note that I'm using the Ids to find both instances. –  Roberto Feb 15 '12 at 17:07
    
@Roberto I'll have to go now.. but in general if you're using relationships in datastore you have to be familiar with the filters that you can apply on queries.. I suggest you go through the overview (the last link) and get familiar with it. –  Lipis Feb 15 '12 at 19:10
2  
It would be so much more useful if there was some sample code to start with. The question is so abstract as to make it hard to answer. For example, you say that the one-to-many relationship implies that they are all in the same entity group, but that is not the only way to model such relationships. OTOH if it is modeled that way, you can use an ancestor query to iterate over the Bs -- why would you use the ids of the Bs? Etc. All this guesswork would be unnecessary if you showed the code you actually have and asked some pointed questions. –  Guido van Rossum Feb 16 '12 at 3:43

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