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How can I match finite natural number series with regex?

So, requirements are:

  • string contains numbers and spaces (as delimiters)
  • first number is 1
  • each number (except the first one) is equal to previous number + 1

Should be matched:

  • 1
  • 1 2
  • 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
  • long series of consequent numbers from 1 to 10^1000

Should not be matched:

  • ``
  • 1 3 4
  • 1 2 3 4 5 6 6

Beside that there are some requirements to regex:

  • it should be single one-shot expression, and not a cycle-condition-algorithm bale of instructions
  • it could use all power of perl regular expressions

I'm not sure that regex are actually lazy, so it would be great if they are. Because the natural number series is non-finite in it's original meaning from number theory.

And the last one. Please notice, that I'm not using the wrong tool for that job. It's not a real world programming task at all.

share|improve this question
    
Well, Perl regular expressions (via (${…}), and PCRE, via (?C…)) allow execution of arbitrary code. I assume you don’t want that? Otherwise the problem is pretty trivial … –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 15 '12 at 16:41
    
@KonradRudolph I would solve it with recursion. –  tchrist Feb 15 '12 at 16:43
    
@tchrist Recursion is necessary anyway. But how would you do it without code execution? –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 15 '12 at 16:47
    
@KonradRudolph By using a base-10 calculator in ASCII. I think you should reverse the string first, though, so 01 -> 9. –  tchrist Feb 15 '12 at 17:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Here you go. Tested on Perl v5.10 through v5.14. The key is the recursive pattern, where we recurse on the (?&Sequence) rule. It’s something of a proof by induction.

The bigint is there just in case you really want to generate a sequence from 1 .. 10**10_000. It will run considerably faster if you can limit yourself to machine native ints, 32-bit or 64-bit depending on your platform.

#!/usr/bin/env perl
use v5.10;
use bigint;  # only if you need stuff over maxint

my $pat = qr{
    ^
    (?= 1 \b )
    (?<Sequence>
        (?<Number> \d+ )
        (?:
            \s+
            (??{  "(?=" . (1 + $+{Number}) . ")" })
            (?&Sequence)
        )?
    )
    $
}x;

# first test embedded data
while (<DATA>) {
    if ( /$pat/ ) {
        print "PASS: ", $_;

    } else {
        print "FAIL: ", $_;
    }
}

# now generate long sequences
for my $big ( 2, 10, 25, 100, 1000, 10_000, 100_000 ) {
    my $str = q();
    for (my $i = 1; $i <= $big; $i++) {
        $str .= "$i ";
    }
    chop $str;
    if ($str =~ $pat) {
        print "PASS: ";
    } else {
        print "FAIL: ";
    }
    if (length($str) > 60) {
        my $len = length($str);
        my $first = substr($str,   0, 10);
        my $last  = substr($str, -10);
        $str = $first . "[$len chars]" . $last;
    }
    say $str;

}


__END__
5
fred
1
1 2 3
1 3 2
1 2 3 4 5
1 2 3 4 6
2 3 4 6
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
1 2 3 4 5 6 6

Which run produces:

FAIL: 5
FAIL: fred
PASS: 1
PASS: 1 2 3
FAIL: 1 3 2
PASS: 1 2 3 4 5
FAIL: 1 2 3 4 6
FAIL: 2 3 4 6
PASS: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
FAIL: 1 2 3 4 5 6 6
PASS: 1 2
PASS: 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10
PASS: 1 2 3 4 5 [65 chars]2 23 24 25
PASS: 1 2 3 4 5 [291 chars] 98 99 100
PASS: 1 2 3 4 5 [3892 chars]8 999 1000
PASS: 1 2 3 4 5 [588894 chars]999 100000

At the risk of seeming self-serving, there is a book that covers this sort of thing. See the section on “Fancy Patterns” in Chapter 5 of Programming Perl, 4ᵗʰ edition. You’ll want to check out the new sections on “Named Groups”, on “Recursive Patterns”, and on “Grammatical Patterns”. The book is at the printers, and should be available electronically in a day or two.

share|improve this answer
    
This still executes code though, doesn’t it? Either way, nice one. –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 15 '12 at 20:10
    
@KonradRudolph Yes, it executes code. I didn’t relish figuring out how exactly to implement a low-level base-10 adder’s functionality in a recursive regex when the easy solution presented itself so obviously. I like how it feels like a proof by induction. Solve for K=1, solve for K=K=1, and bang you’re done. I should update it to show that it works for things greater than maxint. You can do this on smaller strings by showing it works without the initial constrait that the sequence must start with 1. –  tchrist Feb 15 '12 at 20:35
    
okay I wasn't aware of this possibility of execution inside pattern matching. you live and lern ^^ –  Hachi Feb 16 '12 at 7:32

Try next regex (in perl):

m/\A((??{ our $i += 1 })(?>\s*))+\Z/

Test:

Content of script.pl:

use warnings;
use strict;

while ( <DATA> ) { 
    chomp;
    our $i = 0;
    printf qq[%s\n], $_ if m/\A((??{ our $i += 1 })(?>\s*))+\Z/;
}

__DATA__
0
2
1
1 3 4
1 2
1 2 3 4 5 6 6
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
2 1
1 2 3 4 5 7
1           2            3    

Run the script:

perl script.pl

And result:

1
1 2
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19
1           2            3 
share|improve this answer
    
Ah, your solution runs on earlier versions of Perl than my solution does. Mine need v5.10, and yours by the looks of it needs only v5.6. Well done. I find mine slightly more readable than yours, but I’m now utterly averse to patterns without /x to space things out. –  tchrist Feb 15 '12 at 17:11

i don't think there is a possible pattern to fullfil your requirements, because regexes principally match on text; there is no calculation while matching

however you could build your own automaton that performs calculation, or you simply iterate over the numbers, which should be way more efficient

share|improve this answer
    
’Fraid you’re wrong there: he could certainly do those calculations. Remember, he says he can use all the power of perl regular expressions. Those are easily capable of such things. –  tchrist Feb 15 '12 at 16:37
    
okay then please show me an example of calculating inside a pattern. remember he wants to match the numbers, not to replace anything –  Hachi Feb 15 '12 at 16:48
    
Your wish is my command. Vide supra. –  tchrist Feb 15 '12 at 17:10

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