Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

There is simple cipher that translates number to series of . ( )

In order to encrypt a number (0 .. 2147483647) to this representation, I (think I) need:

  • prime factorization
  • for given p (p is Prime), order sequence of p (ie. PrimeOrd(2) == 0, PrimeOrd(227) == 49)

Some examples

    0   .                  6	(()())
    1   ()                 7	(...())
    2   (())               8	((.()))
    3   (.())              9	(.(()))
    4   ((()))            10	(().())
    5   (..())            11	(....())
    227 (................................................())
    2147483648    ((..........()))

My source code for the problem


using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;
using System.IO;

static class P
{
    static List<int> _list = new List<int>();

    public static int Nth(int n)
    {
        if (_list.Count == 0 || _list.Count < n)
            Primes().Take(n + 1);

        return _list[n];
    }

    public static int PrimeOrd(int prime)
    {
        if (_list.Count == 0 || _list.Last() < prime)
            Primes().First(p => p >= prime);

        return (_list.Contains(prime)) ? _list.FindIndex(p => p == prime) : -1;
    }

    public static List<int> Factor(int N)
    {
        List<int> ret = new List<int>();
        for (int i = 2; i ≤ N; i++)
            while (N % i == 0)
            {
                N /= i;
                ret.Add(i);
            }

        return ret;
    }

    public static IEnumerable<int> Primes()
    {
        _list = new List<int>();

        _list.Add(2);
        yield return 2;

        Func<int, bool> IsPrime = n => _list.TakeWhile(p => p ≤ (int)Math.Sqrt(n)).FirstOrDefault(p => n % p == 0) == 0;

        for (int i = 3; i < Int32.MaxValue; i += 2)
        {
            if (IsPrime(i))
            {
                _list.Add(i);
                yield return i;
            }
        }
    }

    public static string Convert(int n)
    {
        if (n == 0) return ".";
        if (n == 1) return "()";

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        var p = Factor(n);
        var max = PrimeOrd(p.Last());
        for (int i = 0; i ≤ max; i++)
        {
            var power = p.FindAll((x) => x == Nth(i)).Count;
            sb.Append(Convert(power));
        }
        return "(" + sb.ToString() + ")";
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        string line = Console.ReadLine();
        try
        {
            int num = int.Parse(line);
            Console.WriteLine("{0}: '{1}'", num, P.Convert(num));
        }
        catch
        {
            Console.WriteLine("You didn't entered number!");
        }
    }
}

The problem is SLOWNESS of procedure PrimeOrd. Do you know some FASTER solution for finding out order of prime in primes?

Heading

If You know how to speed-up finding order of prime number, please, suggest something. :-)

Thank You.


P.S. The biggest prime less than 2,147,483,648 is 2,147,483,647 and it's 105,097,565th prime. There is no need to expect bigger number than 2^31.

share|improve this question
    
I think part of your listing went missing... –  jerryjvl May 30 '09 at 13:16
    
If 2 is PrimeOrd(0), wouldn't that make PrimeOrd(227) = 48? –  Jeff Moser May 30 '09 at 13:25
    
Can you explain why 6 = 2 * 3 = (()()) ? –  Jeff Moser May 30 '09 at 13:36
    
This would make a lot more sense if 6 = (().()) and 10 = (()..()) Are you typed it in here correctly? –  Jeff Moser May 30 '09 at 13:47
    
It still doesn't look like the listing is complete. Where is the convert function? –  Jeff Moser May 30 '09 at 14:08

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You should cache the primes to _list and then use it for both Factor and PrimeOrd. Additionally avoid operators LINQ operators like TakeWhile that create values that you throw away.

Here's an optimized version:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

static class P
{
    private static List<int> _list = new List<int>();

    public static int Nth(int n)
    {
        if (_list.Count == 0 || _list.Count <= n)
        {
            GenerateNextPrimes().First(p => _list.Count >= n);            
        }

        return _list[n];
    }

    public static int PrimeOrd(int prime)
    {
        var primes = GrowPrimesTo(prime);
        return primes.IndexOf(prime);
    }

    public static List<int> Factor(int N)
    {
        List<int> ret = new List<int>();        
        GrowPrimesTo(N);

        for (int ixDivisor = 0; ixDivisor < _list.Count; ixDivisor++)
        {
            int currentDivisor = _list[ixDivisor];

            while (N % currentDivisor == 0)
            {
                N /= currentDivisor;
                ret.Add(currentDivisor);
            }

            if (N <= 1)
            {
                break;
            }
        }

        return ret;
    }

    private static List<int> GrowPrimesTo(int max)
    {
        if (_list.LastOrDefault() >= max)
        {
            return _list;
        }

        GenerateNextPrimes().First(prime => prime >= max);
        return _list;        
    }

    private static IEnumerable<int> GenerateNextPrimes()
    {
        if (_list.Count == 0)
        {
            _list.Add(2);
            yield return 2;
        }

        Func<int, bool> IsPrime =
            n =>
            {
                // cache upperBound
                int upperBound = (int)Math.Sqrt(n);
                for (int ixPrime = 0; ixPrime < _list.Count; ixPrime++)
                {
                    int currentDivisor = _list[ixPrime];
                    if (currentDivisor > upperBound)
                    {
                        return true;
                    }

                    if ((n % currentDivisor) == 0)
                    {
                        return false;
                    }
                }

                return true;
            };

        // Always start on next odd number
        int startNum = _list.Count == 1 ? 3 : _list[_list.Count - 1] + 2;
        for (int i = startNum; i < Int32.MaxValue; i += 2)
        {
            if (IsPrime(i))
            {
                _list.Add(i);
                yield return i;
            }
        }
    }

    public static string Convert(int n)
    {
        if (n == 0) return ".";
        if (n == 1) return "()";

        StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
        var p = Factor(n);
        var max = PrimeOrd(p.Last());
        for (int i = 0; i <= max; i++)
        {
            var power = p.FindAll(x => x == Nth(i)).Count;
            sb.Append(Convert(power));
        }
        return "(" + sb.ToString() + ")";
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {        
        string line = Console.ReadLine();
        int num;

        if(int.TryParse(line, out num))
        {   
            Console.WriteLine("{0}: '{1}'", num, P.Convert(num));             
        }
        else
        {
            Console.WriteLine("You didn't entered number!");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer

This is not something you should be doing at run-time. A better option is to pre-calculate all these primes and then put them in your program somehow (a static array, or a file to be read in). The slow code is then run as part of the development process (which is slow anyway :-), not at the point where you need your speed.

Then it's just a matter of a lookup of some sort rather than calculating them every time you need them.

share|improve this answer
    
I agree with You. If this would be real-life problem. :-) But this is academic compete in programming and you send your source to some proxy and testing proxy runs your code on some 'unit-tests' and comare results with its database. There are some TIMEOUTS for these unit-test and in 2/4 cases, there is TIMEOUT met. Problem is that I don't know what is so slow about it (I don't think it's slow, but The Program against TIMEOUT was computed had to compute it faster than my solution). Thanks for comment, I'd do it Your way in my work. But not at school... –  DinGODzilla May 30 '09 at 14:19
1  
This is really the answer you want though... even if you build the cache as you use it. Currently your application keeps throwing away the works it does in the '_list' variable. –  jerryjvl May 31 '09 at 1:15

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.