Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Help me to resolve this please. The steps that follows that expressions are:

//Expression
offSpring1[m1++] = temp1;

//Steps:

1.- increment m1

2.- assign temp1 to offSpring

I have always thought that the expression inside the brackets was the first to be done. But now I am confuse. So if a write this:

//Expression
offSpring1[++m1] = temp1;
//Steps would be:

1.- assign temp1 to offSpring
2.- increment m1

If the steps would be the same as first ones, what is the difference between i++ and ++i?

share|improve this question
add comment

10 Answers

int i = 0;
std::cout << i++ << std::endl;
std::cout << i << "\nreset" << std::endl;
i = 0;
std::cout << ++i << std::endl;
std::cout << i << std::endl;

output:

0
1
reset
1
1

i++ returns the value as it currently stands in the expression, then increments the variable. ++i will increment the variable, then return the value to use in the current expression.

share|improve this answer
    
cool man! good example. thanks –  Guido Feb 15 '12 at 17:24
add comment
offSpring1[m1++] = temp1;

is

offSpring1[m1] = temp1;
m1 += 1;

and

offSpring1[++m1] = temp1;

is

m1 += 1;
offSpring1[m1] = temp1;
share|improve this answer
add comment
  • j = ++i is the same as i = i+1; j = i;
  • j = i++ is the same as j = i; i = i+1;
share|improve this answer
add comment

Just run these two different test programs to understand the difference between the post-increment and the pre-increment operators

For ++i (pre-increment)

int main()
{
    int* offSpring = calloc(20,sizeof(int));
    int m1 =1;
    offSpring[++m1] = 10;
    printf("%d,%d",offSpring[m1],m1);
}

In the first one you will get 10 as the value of offSpring[m1]. Why? Because this is the pre-increment operator which means that first m1 gets incremented and the the rest gets evaluated.

For i++(post-increment)

int main()
{
    int* offSpring = calloc(20,sizeof(int));
    int m1 =1;
    offSpring[m1++] = 10;
    printf("%d,%d",offSpring[m1],m1);
}

In the second because the post-increment operator is used you will get a 0 value since you are first assigning 10 to offSpring[m1] and then m1 gets incremented.

share|improve this answer
    
Examples using unspecified behavior are terrible, because it's just possible to get 10 in both cases. –  Ben Voigt Feb 15 '12 at 17:28
    
isn't it quite remote to get a 10? I mean I have never encountered anything other than very big values or 0 when debugging my code. But yes ofcourse you are right and for the example to be complete I will edit the answer –  Lefteris Feb 15 '12 at 17:30
add comment

offSpring1[m1++] = temp1; doesn't do what you said.

  1. assign temp_m1 = m1.
  2. increment m1.
  3. index offSpring1[temp_m1]
  4. assign temp1 into indexed value.

On the other hand offSpring1[++m1] = temp1; works like this:

  1. increment m1.
  2. index offSpring1[m1]
  3. assign temp1 into indexed value.
share|improve this answer
    
But step 2 may occur before or after step 4 (in the first case), and I think under the C++11 rules that m1 itself may not be changed until after offSpring is (though the index used is the new value, it may not yet have been stored back to m1). –  Ben Voigt Feb 15 '12 at 17:25
    
@BenVoigt The modifications to offSpring and to m1 are side effects. There is no intervening sequence point (to use the language of C++03), so the order in which they occur is unspecified. (For that matter, if offSpring[m1] happened to refer to m1, the behavior would be undefined.) –  James Kanze Feb 15 '12 at 17:41
    
@James: That's exactly the point I'm trying to make. Can you please check that I've properly explained it in my answer? –  Ben Voigt Feb 15 '12 at 17:42
    
@BenVoigt You said that "m1 may not be changed until after after offSpring is", which is what triggered my response. m1 may be changed either before or after offSpring. (Rereading your sentence, I think it is a bit ambiguous; I read "may not" as an injunction, forbidding what follows, but it could be read associating "not" with "be changed".) –  James Kanze Feb 15 '12 at 18:25
    
@James: I use "may not" as the opposite of "must", and for "it is not allowed", I would have said "must not" or "cannot". The placement of not is rather important, refer to DeMorgan's theorem. But for clarity I guess I should have said "may or may not be". –  Ben Voigt Feb 15 '12 at 18:34
add comment

Even though postfix increment is the first to be evaluated in your first example, its value is the original value of the variable being incremented.

offSpring1[m1++] = temp1;

So even though m1 is incremented before array idexing, the value of temp1 is assigned at position m1 - 1.

share|improve this answer
add comment

There are two aspects to an expression (or sub-expression): its value, and its side effects. The value of i ++ is the value of i; the value of ++ i is the value i + 1, converted to the type of i. This is the value used in the expression. The side effects of both is to increment the variable i. This may occur at any time after the preceding sequence point and before the next. Supposing i is a global variable, and you write something like:

i = 0;
f()[i ++] = g();
f()[++ i] = g();

The standard says nothing about whether the value of i seen in f() or g() is that before the incrementation, or after. In neither case. All the standard says is that the effects of the incrementation will take place after the start of the full expression (but perhaps as the first thing in the full expression) and before the end of it. (And that they won't be interleaved with a function call, so that if f() reads i twice, it is guaranteed to see the same value.)

share|improve this answer
add comment

Unfortunately, in those 2 code snippets you've posted there, there's no guaranteed order of evaluation. If your expressions are inappropriate, more or less anything could happen.

To start with the difference between a++ and ++a:

  • a++ will increment a but the expression using it will see the value of a before the increment
  • ++a will increment a, and the expression using it will see the incremented value.
  • List item

with

buffer[a++] = b;

the compiler can decide to do the ++ at any point within the expression. Thus if 'b' is actually an expression involving a, you can get different results on different compilers. Both of the following would be valid:

  • get the value of a;
  • increment a
  • work out where buffer[old value] points to
  • evaluate b
  • store b

or this

  • evaluate b;
  • work out where buffer[a] points to
  • store b
  • increment a

if 'b' should happen to involve a, those 2 implementations would produce different results. Both are valid.

share|improve this answer
add comment

It works precisely the opposite of what you described:

offSpring1[m1++] = temp1 is the same as offSpring[m1] = temp1; m1 = m1 + 1;

OffSpring1[++m1] = temp1 is the same as m1 = m1 + 1; OffSpring1[m1] = temp1;

Prefix notation increments before evaluating the expression Postfix notation increments after evaluating the expression

share|improve this answer
    
No, it's not the same. Your "equivalent" versions have more sequence points. –  Ben Voigt Feb 15 '12 at 17:29
add comment

The description of the first is the correct description for the second. The correct description of the first is very similar, you just need a "copy current value of m1" step added before the others.

But you do have a distinct lack of sequence points here, if m1 has a primitive type. The rules change somewhat between C++03 and C++11.

If m1 has a user-defined type, then there are function calls involved which influence sequencing.


This code

offSpring1[m1++] = temp1;

performs the following (if m1 is a primitive type):

auto const old_m1(m1);
auto const new_m1(old_m1 + 1);
auto& lhs(offSpring[old_m1]);
parallel { lhs = temp1; m1 = new_m1; }

This code

offSpring1[++m1] = temp1;

is exactly the same except that lhs is bound using new_m1 instead of old_m1.

In either case, it is unspecified whether lhs is written to before or after m1.

If m1 is not a primitive type, it looks more like:

auto const& index = m1.operator++(0); // one argument
auto& lhs = offSpring.operator[](index);
lhs = temp1;

vs

auto const& index = m1.operator++(); // no arguments
auto& lhs = offSpring.operator[](index);
lhs = temp1;

In both these cases, the change to m1 is definitely made before the write to lhs.

share|improve this answer
    
Ben, thanks for your detailed explanation. –  Guido Feb 15 '12 at 18:50
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.