Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

When retrieving data from a database is it more efficient on server resources to always load the data from the database or write the data to a file and use a php include statement to load it? Or is there a better alternative than either of these?

Also, when querying a MySQL database for multiple specific records (ie ids: 1, 5, 27, 24) from a single table is it more efficient to combine the queries into one query or separate them into one query per record?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Madara Uchiha, Alex Coplan, Brad F Jacobs, Charles, Jim Garrison Feb 16 '12 at 0:20

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

10  
How much data? ... although the best answer will be: Try it and profile it. Stuff like this can vary a lot depending on your setup. – Pekka 웃 Feb 15 '12 at 17:19
1  
This question is WAAAAAY beyond the scope of this Q&A site. There are over 9000 things that could affect your configuration. Much like Pekka here said, try it and profile it. – Madara Uchiha Feb 15 '12 at 17:22
1  
Generally filesystem is much efficient than DBMSs. But try it and profile. You will found tons of tutorial on how to do code a stopwatch for profiling in PHP. About the second question, sure, it's better to use, for example WHERE id IN (1,5,27,24) instead of run four queries with WHERE id = N. – lorenzo-s Feb 15 '12 at 17:24
    
doing fewer queries is more efficient. but again, do you need that extra efficiency? – Karoly Horvath Feb 15 '12 at 17:26
up vote 1 down vote accepted

When retrieving data from a database is it more efficient on server resources to always load the data from the database or write the data to a file and use a php include statement to load it? Or is there a better alternative than either of these?

Well, that depends on a lot of things. The common approach is to first just do it with the database, if the site is getting slow, start with caching (that is actually writing the data somewhere else and retrieve it from there instead, but it's originally still managed inside the database). The same works for the HTML that your site outputs, you can cache this server-side as well.

All sites with high-traffic use some kind of database and HTML caching.

Also, when querying a MySQL database for multiple specific records (ie ids: 1, 5, 27, 24) from a single table is it more efficient to combine the queries into one query or separate them into one query per record?

Normally you use one query and the IN() function to do that, e.g. ... WHERE id IN(1, 5, 27, 24), because it's easier for the database server to do this in one query instead of multiple ones.

share|improve this answer

In general, assuming a simple query, it will be more efficient to query and return all of your needed rows versus separating them into individual queries. There is overhead in compiling the query and IO overhead for each query.

However, there are a few obvious exceptions to choosing the "most efficient" method.

Is it likely for the user to cancel a large task in the middle? If so, many smaller queries will allow the user to abort the task part way through, saving the server from the extra work.

Scalability and user friendliness are sometimes at odds with efficiency. If many users must share the resources, the user may experience more responsiveness if the results are returned a little at a time, and faster than having to wait for all of the results.

share|improve this answer

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.