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I did simple test and it seems that Java conversions of String to bytes[] is not one-one, at least using UTF-8.
The code :

    byte[] bytes1 = {-1, 127, 0, 38, 97, 104, 55, 110, 50, -24, -48, 59, -20, -6, 64, 1, 4, 107, 56, 54 };      
    String msg  = new String( bytes1, "UTF-8" );        
    byte[] bytes2 = msg.getBytes( "UTF-8" );                            
    for( byte curr : bytes1 ) {         
        System.out.print( curr );
        System.out.print( ", " );
    }
    System.out.println();
    for( byte curr : bytes2 ) { 
        System.out.print( curr );
        System.out.print( ", " );
    }

I supposed that I'll see two equals lines of output. In reality it was:

 -1, 127, 0, 38, 97, 104, 55, 110, 50, -24, -48, 59, -20, -6, 64, 1, 4, 107, 56, 54, 

 -17, -65, -67, 127, 0, 38, 97, 104, 55, 110, 50, -17, -65, -67, -17, -65, -67, 59, -17, -65, -67, -17, -65, -67, 64, 1, 4, 107, 56, 54, 

I wonder why it happens and how I can achieve one-one conversion. Anybody knows?

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2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You cannot for arbitrary text. Conversion from UTF-16 (the representation in a String) to UTF-8 is defined to be not-one-to-one. See the Unicode standard at Unicode.org.

It looks like what you really want is to pass "UTF-16" as the charset, thus asking for a byte serialization of UTF-16 instead of a conversion to UTF-8.

See http://docs.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/technotes/guides/intl/encoding.doc.html. If you don't want a BOM, use an 'unmarked' variation.

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UTF-16 is not ono-one too.If I change UTF-8 is UTF-16, bytes arrays are almost equal, but there are two differences: two additional numbers -2, -1 at the beginning: -2, -1, -1, 127, 0, 38, 97, 104, 55, 110, 50, -24, -48, 59, -20, -6, 64, 1, 4, 107, 56, 54, –  Igor Grinfeld Feb 16 '12 at 8:32
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In general, the answer to my question is NO. Conversion from bytes to String and back is not one-one, due to two facts:
1. Internal representation of String is two byte per char, and in many encodings (e.g.UTF-8) character code length is variable, so some bytes may be added at end, especially if initial length of bytes array is even. 2. Encodings can add few bytes as prefix for its specific puposes. For instance, UTF-16 adds two bytes suffix that tells wat order of bytes in character to use.

However, I need this conversion for very specific purpose. I want to use pass small objects using AmazonSQS, between our applications. We use Kryo serializer, that converts objects to byte array, but SQS messages are strings. So, I don't use 'real' strings and my workaround is:
1. If string length is even, add three bytes: 0,1,1, else add two bytes: 0,0 to byte array. 2. Convert byte array to string using

    message = URLEncoder.encode( new String( bytes, "UTF-16LE" ), "UTF-16LE" );

UTF-16LE, since order of bytes in character is already known and it avoids two bytes prefix.
3. Send message to queue. 4. Other application reads message from queue and creates

    byte[] bytes = URLDecoder.decode( message, "UTF-16LE" ).getBytes( "UTF-16LE" );

5. If last byte is 0, use all bytes except last two for deserialization, else use all bytes except last three.

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More simple, but less compact solution, is to use Base64 in apache-common-codec. See stackoverflow.com/questions/7508464/… –  Igor Grinfeld Feb 19 '12 at 9:43
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