Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Okay, here's sample code comparing an Object Oriented Programming (OOP) solution vs a Data Oriented Design (DOD) solution of updating a bunch of balls.

const size_t ArraySize = 1000;

class Ball
{
public:
    float x,y,z;
    Ball():
        x(0),
        y(0),
        z(0)
    {
    }

    void Update()
    {
        x += 5;
        y += 5;
        z += 5;
    }
};

std::vector<Ball> g_balls(ArraySize);

class Balls
{
public:
    std::vector<float> x;
    std::vector<float> y;
    std::vector<float> z;

    Balls():
        x(ArraySize,0),
        y(ArraySize,0),
        z(ArraySize,0)
    {
    }

    void Update()
    {
        const size_t num = x.size();
        if(num == 0)
        {
            return;
        }

        const float* lastX = &x[num - 1];

        float* pX = &x[0];
        float* pY = &y[0];
        float* pZ = &z[0];
        for( ; pX <= lastX; ++pX, ++pY, ++pZ)
        {
            *pX += 5;
            *pY += 5;
            *pZ += 5;
        }
    }
};

int main()
{
    Balls balls;

    Timer time1;
    time1.Start();
    balls.Update();
    time1.Stop();

    Timer time2;
    time2.Start();
    const size_t arrSize = g_balls.size();
    if(arrSize > 0)
    {
        const Ball* lastBall = &g_balls[arrSize - 1];
        Ball* pBall = &g_balls[0];
        for( ; pBall <= lastBall; ++pBall)
        {
            pBall->Update();
        }
    }
    time2.Stop();


    printf("Data Oriented design time: %f\n",time1.Get_Microseconds());
    printf("OOB oriented design  time: %f\n",time2.Get_Microseconds());

    return 0;
}

Now, this does compile and run in Visual Studio, though I'm wondering if I'm allowed to do this, supposed to be able to reliably do this:

const float* lastX = &x[num - 1];//remember, x is a std::vector of floats

float* pX = &x[0];//remember, x is a std::vector of floats
float* pY = &y[0];//remember, y is a std::vector of floats
float* pZ = &z[0];//remember, z is a std::vector of floats
for( ; pX <= lastX; ++pX, ++pY, ++pZ)
{
    *pX += 5;
    *pY += 5;
    *pZ += 5;
}

From my understanding the data in a std::vector are supposed to be contiguous, though I'm not sure because of how it's being stored internally if this is going to be an issue on another platform, if it breaks the standard. Also, this was the only way I was able to get the DOD solution to outdo the OOP solution, any other way of iterating wasn't as good. I could use iterators, though I'm pretty sure that it might only be quicker than OOP with optimizations enabled, aka in release mode.

So, is this a good way to do DOD (best way?), and is this legal c++?

[EDIT] Okay, for DOD this is a poor example; the x,y,z should be packaged in a Vector3. So, while DOD ran faster in debug than OOP, in release it was another story. Again, this is a bad example of how you would want to use DOD efficiently, though it does show it's short-comings if you need to access a bunch of data at the same time. The key to using DOD properly is to, "design data based on access patterns".

share|improve this question
4  
It's definitely legal C++, but I don't see anything particularly magical about it such that it deserves a wishy-washy design pattern name. What problem are you trying to solve? –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 15 '12 at 18:01
1  
@leetNightshade: It might be faster to iterate through a single array of floats than an array of Ball objects with a single float, but it'll definitely be slower to iterate through three vectors instead of one vector of Ball objects with three floats each.. –  André Caron Feb 15 '12 at 18:25
1  
I don't think that this is "data-oriented design"; I think it's called "software development". –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 15 '12 at 19:17
1  
@leetNightshade: I know you didn't invent it; that doesn't stop me from bashing it repeatedly whilst questioning whether you're actually employing it, and whether the factors you identify in your question have anything to do with it. :) –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 15 '12 at 19:22
1  
@leetNightshade: a dark and lonely childhood haunted by images of aggressive mountain bears –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 15 '12 at 19:33

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

The question with all the code and such is a bit convoluted, so let's try to see if I understand what you really need:

From my understanding the data in a std::vector are supposed to be contiguous

It is. The standard mandates that the data in the vector is stored contiguously, which means that this will be the case in all platforms / compilers that conform to the standard.

this was the only way I was able to get the DOD solution to outdo the OOP solution

I don't know what you mean with DOD

I could use iterators, though I'm pretty sure that might only be quicker with optimizations

Actually, iterators in this case (assuming that you have debug iterators disabled in VS) will be as fast if not faster than direct modifications through pointers. An iterator into a vector can be implemented with a plain pointer to the element. Again, note that by default in VS iterators do extra work to help debugging.

The next thing to consider is that the memory layout of the two approaches differs, which means that if at a later stage you need to access all x, y and z from a single element, in the first case they will most probably fall in a single cache line, while in the three vectors approach it will require pulling memory from three different locations.

share|improve this answer
    
Okay, this was probably a bad example, as ordinarily I'd have a Vector3. Even so, I was surprised to see the Data Oriented Design by accessing three separate arrays was faster than packaging all of the variables in an object typical in OOP. So, it makes sense to me how the variables x,y,z would be loaded into the cache, and the DOD solution would have catch misses. But how come overall it runs slower? I'll get back to you with more benchmark tests. –  leetNightshade Feb 15 '12 at 18:09
    
Okay, bad example indeed. In debug the DOD solution is faster, but in release it is not. Again, probably because I'm accessing three different arrays. –  leetNightshade Feb 15 '12 at 18:10
    
Next time could you please provide an official link to the standard you're quoting, so I know it's a fact and not just something you think is a fact? Thank you for fully answering all of my questions. :) –  leetNightshade Feb 15 '12 at 18:32
1  
@leetNightshade: If you have a copy of the standard (or draft) at hand it is quite easy to find the quote in 23.3.6.1 Class template vector overview, first paragraph: The elements of a vector are stored contiguously It is a well known fact and I did not think that I needed a quote for that... –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 15 '12 at 18:47
    
@ David Rodríguez - dribeas: Actually, concerning the data being stored contiguously, was not my question. I knew that already, as indicated in my post. What I didn't know is if you could reliably grab a reference from a vector and iterate on it as a pointer of what the vector was storing. That, I don't think is common knowledge. –  leetNightshade Feb 15 '12 at 19:00

Yes, you can do this.

Vector containers are implemented as dynamic arrays; Just as regular arrays, vector containers have their elements stored in contiguous storage locations, which means that their elements can be accessed not only using iterators but also using offsets on regular pointers to elements. http://cplusplus.com/reference/stl/vector/

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I love it when people provide the link to the standard, so I know they're not pulling it out of their @55. +1 –  leetNightshade Feb 15 '12 at 18:28
    
that is a good link but it does not point to the "standard". –  fizzbuzz Feb 15 '12 at 18:49
    
@fizzbuzz Ah, well what is a link to the standard? I found this: en.cppreference.com/w/cpp –  leetNightshade Feb 15 '12 at 18:59
1  
@leetNightshade kindly refer this herbsutter.com/2010/03/03/… –  fizzbuzz Feb 15 '12 at 20:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.