Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have the following C# project targetting .NET 4.0 that takes a source code file, compiles it into an assembly on the fly and then executes a static method of a type contained in that assembly.

This works as expected, as long as I don't start the program with a debugger attached. In that case I get an exception on the call to xmlSerializer.Serialize(sw, family);, more precisely a System.NullReferenceException inside a System.TypeInitializationException inside a System.InvalidOperationException.

If I take the same program, include the source code file in the project and compile it directly into the main program assembly, I will not get an exception regardless of whether or not a debugger is attached.

Please note that I my project references the exact same assemblies as those listed when compiling on the fly.

Why does it matter to the code compiled on the fly whether or not a debugger is attached? What am I missing?

Main file Program.cs:

using System;
using System.CodeDom.Compiler;
using System.IO;
using System.Reflection;
using System.Linq;

namespace DebugSerializeCompiler
{
    class Program
    {
        static void Main()
        {
            if (!Environment.GetCommandLineArgs().Contains("Compile"))
            {
                DebugSerializeCompiler.SerializerTest.Run();
            }
            else
            {
                Assembly assembly;
                if (TryCompile("..\\..\\SerializerTest.cs", new[]{ "Microsoft.CSharp.dll",
                   "System.dll", "System.Core.dll", "System.Data.dll", "System.Xml.dll" }, 
                   out assembly))
                {
                    Type type = assembly.GetType("DebugSerializeCompiler.SerializerTest");
                    MethodInfo methodInfo = type.GetMethod("Run");
                    methodInfo.Invoke(null, null);
                }
            }
            Console.ReadKey();
        }

        static bool TryCompile(string fileName, string[] referencedAssemblies, 
           out Assembly assembly)
        {
            bool result;

            CodeDomProvider compiler = CodeDomProvider.CreateProvider("CSharp");
            var compilerparams = new CompilerParameters 
                                     {
                                        GenerateExecutable = false, 
                                        GenerateInMemory = true
                                     };
            foreach (var referencedAssembly in referencedAssemblies)
            {
                compilerparams.ReferencedAssemblies.Add(referencedAssembly);
            }

            using (var reader = new StreamReader(fileName))
            {
                CompilerResults compilerResults = 
                   compiler.CompileAssemblyFromSource(compilerparams, reader.ReadToEnd());
                assembly = compilerResults.CompiledAssembly;
                result = !compilerResults.Errors.HasErrors;
                if (!result)
                {
                    Console.Out.WriteLine("Compiler Errors:");
                    foreach (CompilerError error in compilerResults.Errors)
                    {
                        Console.Out.WriteLine("Position {0}.{1}: {2}", 
                           error.Line, error.Column, error.ErrorText);
                    }
                }
            }

            return result;
        }
    }
}

File compiled into separate assembly SerializerTest.cs:

using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.IO;
using System.Xml.Serialization;

namespace DebugSerializeCompiler
{
    public  class SerializerTest
    {
        public static void Run()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Executing Run()");
            var family = new Family();
            var xmlSerializer = new XmlSerializer(typeof(Family));

            TextWriter sw = new StringWriter();
            try
            {
                if (sw == null) Console.WriteLine("sw == null");
                if (family == null) Console.WriteLine("family == null");
                if (xmlSerializer == null) Console.WriteLine("xmlSerializer == null");
                xmlSerializer.Serialize(sw, family);
            }
            catch (Exception e)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Exception caught:");
                Console.WriteLine(e);
            }
            Console.WriteLine(sw);
        }
    }

    [Serializable]
    public class Family
    {
        public string LastName { get; set; }

        public List<FamilyMember> FamilyMembers { get; set; }
    }

    [Serializable]
    public class FamilyMember
    {
        public string FirstName { get; set; }
    }
}

This is the csproj file used to compile the project using Visual C# 2010 Express on Windows 7:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8"?>
<Project ToolsVersion="4.0" DefaultTargets="Build" xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/developer/msbuild/2003">
  <PropertyGroup>
    <Configuration Condition=" '$(Configuration)' == '' ">Debug</Configuration>
    <Platform Condition=" '$(Platform)' == '' ">x86</Platform>
    <ProductVersion>8.0.30703</ProductVersion>
    <SchemaVersion>2.0</SchemaVersion>
    <ProjectGuid>{7B8D2187-4C58-4310-AC69-9F87107C25AA}</ProjectGuid>
    <OutputType>Exe</OutputType>
    <AppDesignerFolder>Properties</AppDesignerFolder>
    <RootNamespace>DebugSerializeCompiler</RootNamespace>
    <AssemblyName>DebugSerializeCompiler</AssemblyName>
    <TargetFrameworkVersion>v4.0</TargetFrameworkVersion>
    <TargetFrameworkProfile>Client</TargetFrameworkProfile>
    <FileAlignment>512</FileAlignment>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <PropertyGroup Condition=" '$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Debug|x86' ">
    <PlatformTarget>x86</PlatformTarget>
    <DebugSymbols>true</DebugSymbols>
    <DebugType>full</DebugType>
    <Optimize>false</Optimize>
    <OutputPath>bin\Debug\</OutputPath>
    <DefineConstants>DEBUG;TRACE</DefineConstants>
    <ErrorReport>prompt</ErrorReport>
    <WarningLevel>4</WarningLevel>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <PropertyGroup Condition=" '$(Configuration)|$(Platform)' == 'Release|x86' ">
    <PlatformTarget>x86</PlatformTarget>
    <DebugType>pdbonly</DebugType>
    <Optimize>true</Optimize>
    <OutputPath>bin\Release\</OutputPath>
    <DefineConstants>TRACE</DefineConstants>
    <ErrorReport>prompt</ErrorReport>
    <WarningLevel>4</WarningLevel>
  </PropertyGroup>
  <ItemGroup>
    <Reference Include="System" />
    <Reference Include="System.Core" />
    <Reference Include="Microsoft.CSharp" />
    <Reference Include="System.Data" />
    <Reference Include="System.Xml" />
  </ItemGroup>
  <ItemGroup>
    <Compile Include="Program.cs" />
    <Compile Include="Properties\AssemblyInfo.cs" />
    <Compile Include="SerializerTest.cs">
      <SubType>Code</SubType>
    </Compile>
  </ItemGroup>
  <Import Project="$(MSBuildToolsPath)\Microsoft.CSharp.targets" />
  <!-- To modify your build process, add your task inside one of the targets below and uncomment it. 
       Other similar extension points exist, see Microsoft.Common.targets.
  <Target Name="BeforeBuild">
  </Target>
  <Target Name="AfterBuild">
  </Target>
  -->
</Project>
share|improve this question
    
So which object is null? – Ramhound Feb 15 '12 at 19:07
    
@Ramhound Good question. Certainly none of my objects are null. I just added a check to clarify that. – PersonalNexus Feb 15 '12 at 19:22
    
You can also try using the Roslyn preview and see if you have better luck with it than the CodeDom. There are other tools that do similar things as well, such as the mono compiler as a server and NRefactory... The codedom pretty much sucks. – justin.m.chase Feb 15 '12 at 20:49
up vote 2 down vote accepted

It worked fine for me.

But if I had to guess what's going on for you it would be that because you're compiling the class in with your main project and dynamically compiling it the serializer is getting confused about which assembly to use and is failing. You could try attaching an event to AppDomain.CurrentDomain.AssemblyResolve and see if there are any assemblies failing to resolve there.

share|improve this answer
    
What IDE and version are you using? What framework version is this? I am using VS 2008 SP1 on win7 and your code is running compiled as is without any problems. It works the same for me with or without the debugger attached. Do you have any extensions, such as R#? Can you show the .csproj file? You might have something weird going on in the way you are compiling the project. – justin.m.chase Feb 15 '12 at 20:47
    
This is it. In the AppDomain.CurrentAppDomain.AssemblyResolve event handler I get a request for the assembly compiled on the fly, but only when running under the debugger. When I save the assembly in a field _assembly after compilation and return it when the requested assembly's name matches the name of the compiled assembly in the event handler, it works even with the debugger attached. I would really like to know why that makes a difference, though. – PersonalNexus Feb 15 '12 at 20:52
    
It's .NET 4.0 and I have tried this with Visual Studio 2010 Premium as well as the Visual Studio 2010 Express Edition (no extensions) with a standard Console Application project and no changes to any IDE or debugger settings. I will include the .csproj file in the question. – PersonalNexus Feb 15 '12 at 20:53
    
Sorry, I am using 2010 also. I misspoke when I said 2008. – justin.m.chase Feb 15 '12 at 20:55

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.