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I try to calculate with JS' modulo function, but don't get the right result (which should be 1). Here is a hardcoded piece of code.

var checkSum = 210501700012345678131468;
alert(checkSum % 97);

Result: 66

Whats the problem here?

Regards, Benedikt

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5 Answers 5

A bunch of improvements to Benedikt's version: "cRest += '' + cDivident;" is a bugfix; parseInt(divisor) makes it possible to pass both arguments as strings; check for empty string at the end makes it always return numerical values; added var statements so it's not using global variables; converted foreach to old-style for so it works in browsers with older Javascript; fixed the cRest == 0; bug (thanks @Dan.StackOverflow).

function modulo (divident, divisor) {
    var cDivident = '';
    var cRest = '';

    for (var i in divident ) {
        var cChar = divident[i];
        var cOperator = cRest + '' + cDivident + '' + cChar;

        if ( cOperator < parseInt(divisor) ) {
                cDivident += '' + cChar;
        } else {
                cRest = cOperator % divisor;
                if ( cRest == 0 ) {
                    cRest = '';
                }
                cDivident = '';
        }

    }
    cRest += '' + cDivident;
    if (cRest == '') {
        cRest = 0;
    }
    return cRest;
}
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thank you for your improvements –  Benedikt May 6 '10 at 17:39
1  
Small bug/typo. The final 'cRest == 0' should really be 'cRest = 0'. –  Dan.StackOverflow Mar 29 '12 at 16:34

looks like you've fallen victim to this: http://stackoverflow.com/questions/307179/what-is-javascripts-max-int-whats-the-highest-integer-value-a-number-can-go-to

just to reiterate what's in the other thread:

they are 64-bit floating point values, the largest exact integral value is 2^53. however, from the spec section [8.5: Number Type]:

Some ECMAScript operators deal only with integers in the range −2^31 through 2^31−1, inclusive, or in the range 0 through 2^32−1, inclusive. These operators accept any value of the Number type but first convert each such value to one of 2^32 integer values. See the descriptions of the ToInt32 and ToUint32 operators in sections 0 and 0, respectively

But credit where credit is due. Jimmy got the accepted answer over there for doing the legwork (well, googling).

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1  
So, is there a workaround for this? I can't find anything helpful via google. –  Benedikt May 30 '09 at 15:53
    
Couldn't you do a division and calculate the remainder? –  gnarf May 30 '09 at 16:09
    
given that the checksum given above is already above 2^53, you'd have to do something a little more .... interesting... to break up the number before performing any operations on it –  Jonathan Fingland May 31 '09 at 0:06
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Finally, my solution:

function modulo (divident, divisor) {
    cDivident = '';
    cRest = '';

    for each ( var cChar in divident ) {
    	cOperator = cRest + '' + cDivident + '' + cChar;

    	if ( cOperator < divisor ) {
    		cDivident += '' + cChar;
    	} else {
    		cRest = cOperator % divisor;
    		if ( cRest == 0 ) cRest = '';
    		cDivident = '';
    	}

    }

    return cRest;
}
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Silent Matt has developed a Javascript library for Big Integers. It could solve this issue too.

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But this library does not contain a modulo functionality, does it? –  Benedikt Dec 15 '10 at 20:51
1  
Yes it does, see divRem or remainder –  JVerstry Dec 18 '10 at 22:06

For an IBAN calculation form a normal bankaccount number I end up with a very large number contained in a string datatype. From this large number I have to find the rest when divided by 97 -> large number % 97.

As soon as I convert the datatype to an integer I get an overflow resulting in a negative integer and eventually a wrong rest value. As I saw some verbose pieces of code (which also gave wrong outcome), I could not resist to share my own. Credits go to Finding Modulus of a Very Large Number with a Normal Number

modulo: function(divident, divisor) {
    var partLength = 10;

    while (divident.length > partLength) {
        var part = divident.substring(0, partLength);
        divident = (part % divisor) +  divident.substring(partLength);          
    }

    return divident % divisor;
}

N.B. I use 10 positions here as this is smaller than the 15 (and some) positions of max integer in JavaScript, it results in a number bigger than 97 and it's a nice round number. The first two arguments matter.

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