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I have an existing algorithm and I need to optimize it sligtly if it is possible. Changing a lot in this algorithm is not an option at the moment. The algoritm works with instance of std::vector< std::vector<unsigned char> >. It looks like this:

typedef std::vector<unsigned char> internal_vector_t;
std::vector< internal_vector_t > internal_vectors; 

while (fetching lots of records) {
   internal_vector_t tmp;
   // reads 1Mb of chars in tmp...
   internal_vectors.push_back(tmp);
   // some more work
}

// use this internal_vectors

The algorithm inserts a lot of times in internal_vectors instances of internal_vector_t using push_back(). Most of instances of internal_vector_t have size 1 Mb. Since the size of the internal_vectors is unknown no reserve() is done beforehand.

The first thing that I don't understand is what is happening when internal_vectors reachs its current capacity, needs to allocate a new block and copy its current content in the bigger block of memory. Since most of the blocks are 1Mb in size copying is a long operation. Should I expect that a compiler (gcc 4.3, MS VC++ 2008) will manage to optimize it in order to avoid copying?

If copying is unavoidable will changing to std::deque help? I consider std::deque because I still need accessing by index like internal_vectors[10]. Like this:

typedef std::vector<unsigned char> internal_vector_t;
std::deque< internal_vector_t > internal_vectors; 
// the same while

As far as I understand std::deque does not need relocate that was once allocated. Am I right that std::deque in this situation will requere less allocation and copying on push_backs?


Update:
1) According to DeadMG MSVC9 does this type of optimization (The Swaptimization - TR1 Fixes In VC9 SP1). gcc 4.3 probably doesn't do this type of optimization.

2) I have profiled the version of the algorithm that use std::deque< std::vector<unsigned char> > and I see that its performace is better.

3) I have also made use of using swap that was suggested by Mark Ransom. Using this improved the performance:

   internal_vector_t tmp;
   internal_vectors.push_back(empty);
   tmp.swap(internal_vectors.back());
share|improve this question
    
are you using insert or push_back? The code says insert the text push_back, and the cost of both is quite different for a vector. –  David Rodríguez - dribeas Feb 15 '12 at 19:26
1  
When it runs out of capacity, it has to allocate more RAM, obviously. It does that based on an increment value. Both increment, and initial capacity should be setable afiak. The higher the increment value, the more memory it will allocate each time it runs out. –  crush Feb 15 '12 at 19:26
    
just reserve() a big chunk (2048?), that should solve the issue... –  Karoly Horvath Feb 15 '12 at 19:26
1  
I use push_back, fixed it in my question –  skwllsp Feb 15 '12 at 19:26
    
@skwllsp: Then your code sample is not related to your question, and we cannot reliably help further. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 15 '12 at 19:28

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted

MSVC9 implements something known as "swaptimization" for it's Standard containers. It's a weaker version of move semantics. When the external vector is resized, it will not copy the internal vectors.

However, you'd do best simply upgrading your compiler to MSVC10 or GCC (4.5, I think it is) which will give you move semantics, which makes such operations vastly more efficient. Of course, a std::deque is probably still the smarter container, but move semantics are performance-beneficial in many, many places.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there anything similar to swaptimization in gcc? You mentioned gcc 4.5. –  skwllsp Feb 16 '12 at 6:25
1  
@skwllsp: The proper version is Move Semantics, it's a C++11 feature. You can find it in MSVC10 and in some recent version of GCC, 4.4 or 4.5 –  Puppy Feb 16 '12 at 7:37
1  
+1, I've never heard of "swaptimization"... lol –  Mysticial Feb 16 '12 at 9:13

Each time you insert a internal_vector_t into internal_vectors, it is going to make a copy of the internal_vector_t. This will be true whether you use vector or deque. The standard containers always make a copy of the object you're inserting.

You can eliminate the copying by inserting an empty internal_vector_t and then swap the contents of the inserted object with the one you really wanted to insert.

Occasionally the vector will need to resize itself as it runs out of room during an insertion, which would result in objects being copied again. A deque will eliminate this as long as you're always inserting at the beginning or end.

Edit: The advice I gave above can be summarized with these code changes. This code should avoid all copying of the large vectors.

typedef std::vector<unsigned char> internal_vector_t;
std::deque< internal_vector_t > internal_vectors; 
internal_vector_t empty;

while (fetching lots of records) {
   internal_vector_t tmp;
   // reads 1Mb of chars in tmp...
   internal_vectors.push_back(empty);
   tmp.swap(internal_vectors.back());
   // some more work
}
share|improve this answer
    
Actually I am mainly interested in optimizing this: Occasionally the vector will need to resize itself as it runs out of room during an insertion since this is the second most often called function when I profile code. –  skwllsp Feb 15 '12 at 19:37
    
@skwllsp, vector is usually designed to allocate ever greater amounts so that the frequency of copying decreases as the number of items to copy increases. Are you able to tell if the calls are coming from internal_vector_t or internal_vectors? –  Mark Ransom Feb 15 '12 at 19:45
    
Yes, I am able. The calls are coming either from std::vector< std::vector <uchar> >::M_fill_insert or std::vector<uchar>::M_fill_insert. std::vector< std::vector <uchar> >::M_fill_insert takes more time to process. That is why I ask about possible optimization and about using std::deque –  skwllsp Feb 15 '12 at 19:49
    
@skwllsp, since you're using push_back you won't incur any copying overhead with std::deque, so it would appear to be a good choice in your situation. Why haven't you just tried it already to see if it made an improvement? –  Mark Ransom Feb 15 '12 at 19:56
1  
@DeadMG, interesting. I had considered that such an optimization would be possible, but how does the compiler know that the types are swappable? Wouldn't that result in pessimization if the type didn't specialize std::swap? –  Mark Ransom Feb 16 '12 at 4:32

std::deque does not store it's elements contiguously - it breaks it's storage up into a series of constant sized "blocks". This means that when a std::deque runs out of capacity it only needs to allocate a new block of constant size - it does not need to reallocate it's whole internal buffer and move all of it's existing elements.

std::vector on the other hand does maintain contiguous storage, so when it runs out of capacity and reallocates, it does need to move all of it's existing elements - this can be expensive.

std::vector is "smart" about its reallocation scheme, allocating in chunks according to a geometric series (often doubling or increasing the capacity by 1.5 etc). This means that reallocation doesn't occur often.

std::deque may be more efficient in this case since when reallocation does occur it does less work. As always, you'd have to benchmark to get any real numbers.

Your code could probably be improved further in other areas. It seems that at each iteration of the while loop you're creating a new internal_vector_t tmp. It may be more efficient to declare this outside the loop and just ::clear() it's storage at each iteration. You're also copying the whole tmp vector each time you call internal_vectors.push_back(tmp) - you could probably improve on this by just moving the tmp vector via internal_vectors.push_back(std::move(tmp)) - this will just copy a few pointers.

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
@MooingDuck: Yes, I think you're right - changed. –  Darren Engwirda Feb 15 '12 at 20:09
    
I basically only use std::deque for FIFO queues, or if I need a growing container that commonly takes more than half my RAM (very rare). –  Mooing Duck Feb 15 '12 at 20:15
    
@MooingDuck: I think there are other use-cases than that. If you have no idea how much space to ::reserve and the size might end up large (essentially this question) I would look at std::deque. It's not only the reallocation cost of std::vector that can be an issue, but also the potential for memory fragmentation on repeated realloc's. Typically I've found that std::deque can be more efficient at sizes << half RAM, but of course you have to benchmark the particular code you're working with. –  Darren Engwirda Feb 15 '12 at 20:36
1  
The trick is deque tends to make far more allocations than a vector, though it doesn't have the copy, which makes comparison hard. For pushing back 5000 int, MSFT's vector will do ~19 allocations, deque ~1250 allocations. For gcc, that's ~12 and ~39 respectively. But a deque doesn't copy. @skwllsp: profile! –  Mooing Duck Feb 15 '12 at 21:27
    
@MooingDuck: It's well known that the (current) MSVC std::deque is deeply flawed, as they allocate in crazy small blocks of 16 bytes, leading to the behaviour that you mention. I don't use the MSVC container for this reason, and I think it's unfair to make generalisations based on one particular std library's implementation issues. –  Darren Engwirda Feb 16 '12 at 1:58

Are you indexing the outer vector? If not, how about std::list<std::vector<unsigned char> >?

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I mentioned it in my question. I consider std::deque because I still need accessing by index like internal_vectors[10]. –  skwllsp Feb 15 '12 at 19:32
    
@skwllsp Do you actually need random access? You might get away with traversing through the list. Just increment a counter and check if one of the elements you need is at that index. I hope I'm making sense –  pezcode Feb 15 '12 at 20:00
    
@pezcode Do you actually need random access? Not sure. But significant change in this algorithm is not an option, sadly. –  skwllsp Feb 15 '12 at 20:12

A dequeue may be more efficient depending on the implementation. Unlike a vector, a dequeue will not guarantee continuous storage and can thus allocate several separate blocks of memory. Therefore it can allocate more memory without moving elements already added. You should try it and measure the impact.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for profiling, since I think the difference in this case will be in the nanoseconds total. –  Mooing Duck Feb 15 '12 at 20:03

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