Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a program that I want to be continually running. The way I have it coded now, once it reaches the end of its' function, it calls itself; it never actually reaches its' End Sub line.

Sub run

    *Run all code here*

    Call run

End Sub

Questions have been raised about this, the concern being that the program never has a chance to "pop" everything that has been "pushed" onto it. Basically, after a certain period of time the constant self-calling would overload the cpu. The alternative that was suggested was instead to have a while loop that never ends, essentially

Sub run

While program_run = true then

    *Run all code here* 

Loop

End Sub

And just to never make program_run = false.

  1. I worded a number of things in "layman-y" because I'm not sure of the correct, technical terms.

  2. I'm familiar with the terms "pop" and "push" in the context of lists and data structures, but only on a basic level; I don't think that those specific terms apply to this situation, but that's how it was worded to me. (The program downloads .csv's and does a bunch of data manipulation, ie.formatting, copy/pasting, uploading to MySQL etc.)

  3. This also has to do with making sure that the hardware doesn't steadily get overloaded, so if this is more appropriate in SuperUser, I understand.

Questions:

  1. Is the concern that the program/hardware will be "overloaded" a legitimate one?

  2. Is there any practical difference between a self calling module and while loop that never ends?

Thank you for any help in advance!

share|improve this question
    
Quick question. Why do you need to have an unending loop? What is it that are you trying to achieve? –  Siddharth Rout Feb 16 '12 at 0:25
    
It's a program that downloads data files from a list of websites and uploads them in to database; I need to be able to start it and walk away from it and have it continue until I want it to stop. See my other comments for how I stop it. –  Quintis555 Feb 16 '12 at 15:16

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you use a self-calling function, everytime it calls itself, a new function is added to the stack. An easy way to check that is to run the code below in debug mode (F8) and after a few calls, check the stack (View / Stack or CTRL + L): you will see that the stack has several calls to the procedure.

Sub test()

  test

End Sub

If you just run that code (F5), you will get an "out of stack space" error fairly quickly (after a second or 2 on my machine).

If you use an infinite loop, assuming your loop does not have any memory leaks, you should not have any overflow problems. But this is not very clean as you need to "kill" the procedure to stop it.

An alternative (depending on what you are trying to achieve) would be to have a sort of scheduler that runs your loop every x seconds and can be stopped on demand.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm setting this as the answer because this is actually the one I saw first, and the one that, while not as exhaustive, answered my question very nicely. Also, you gave me a test sub (that I honestly should have just thought of doing for myself in the first place,) which was very helpful :) Thanks to both @Jean-Francois Corbett and @assylias! –  Quintis555 Feb 16 '12 at 15:22

1. Is the concern that the program/hardware will be "overloaded" a legitimate one?

Depends what you mean by "overloaded". Depending on your exact code, this could cause one processor to run continuously and therefore heat up. But computers are usually designed to be able to deal with this, and it should not cause problems as long as you don't obstruct its ventilation. It could drain a laptop battery pretty quickly, though. All of this really depends on what exactly your code is doing.

As for "overloading the program", I don't know what this means, but it does lead nicely to your second question:

2. Is there any practical difference between a self calling module and while loop that never ends?

Yes, there is a difference. Since you are asking this on stackoverflow.com, you will be interested to know that your first bit of code (a self-calling procedure) will literally lead to a stack overflow. You're not "overloading the CPU", you are exhausting the memory available on the call stack. This amount of memory is not infinite, but a little bit more of it gets occupied each time you call your run procedure an infinite number of times, so yeah, at some point you run out and get a stack overflow.

As for your second bit of code, it will not compile. (While ... Then ... Loop does not exist in VBA. You're mixing up three different kinds of syntax.)

If you are absolutely sure that you want your program to run until the end of time (as far as your computer is concerned), then you can make an infinite loop like this:

Sub run()
    Do
        '*Run all code here*
    Loop
End Sub

However it is unlikely that you really, actually want your code to run until the end of time. I would ask myself what a plausible end condition would be, and implement it.

Sub run()
    Dim endConditionReached As Boolean
    endConditionReached = False
    Do While Not endConditionReached 
        '*Run all code here*
        ' code sets endConditionReached to True when appropriate
    Loop
End Sub
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for this excellent answer! I forgot to mention that I DO have an exit strategy; when it finishes its' list of IP address to download from, it gives the user 5 seconds to answer a user form, whether they want it to continue or not. If there is no answer, it automatically continues the program. As for the syntax problems in my question, that was me mostly just being lazy and not making sure I had my Do While syntax accurate ;) –  Quintis555 Feb 16 '12 at 15:19
    
+1. Nicely explained! You really take efforts in explaining things. A very good gesture :) –  Siddharth Rout Feb 17 '12 at 0:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.