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The UNIX sort command can sort a very large file like this:

sort large_file

How is the sort algorithm implemented?

How come it does not cause excessive consumption of memory?

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3  
That command line hardly challenges sort. It lists one file name pipes the name (not the file contents) through sort (which then has nothing to do) and outputs it. Please edit your question. –  anon May 30 '09 at 16:23
    
Fixed -- use cat instead of ls to list the contents of a file –  tvanfosson May 30 '09 at 16:25
    
Edited the command again. UUoC. ;) –  ayaz May 30 '09 at 16:26
    
This is interesting. I don't really know how it works, but I have a guess. It probably puts the first character of each key into a binary tree, and when there is a collision, it uses the next character of the key also, so it doesn't save more of the key than it needs to. It may then save an offset into the file with each key so it can seek back and print each line in order. –  Zifre May 30 '09 at 16:28
2  
@Neil - from the context it seemed obvious that he was trying to sort the contents of the file not the file name (which for one name is meaningless). I just wanted to improve the question without changing the context too much so that it would get answers instead of downvotes because of a simple mistake. –  tvanfosson May 30 '09 at 16:41

7 Answers 7

up vote 66 down vote accepted

The Algorithmic details of UNIX Sort command says Unix Sort uses an External R-Way merge sorting algorithm. The link goes into more details, but in essence it divides the input up into smaller portions (that fit into memory) and then merges each portion together at the end.

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The sort command stores working data in temporary disk files (usually in /tmp).

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12  
use -T to specify the temp dir –  glenn jackman Jun 22 '11 at 0:37

I'm not familiar with the program but I guess it is done by means of external sorting (most of the problem is held in temporary files while relatively small part of the problem is held in memory at a time). See Donald Knuth's The Art of Computer Programming, Vol. 3 Sorting and Searching, Section 5.4 for very in-depth discussion of the subject.

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#!/bin/bash

usage ()
{
    echo Parallel sort
    echo usage: psort file1 file2
    echo Sorts text file file1 and stores the output in file2
}

# test if we have two arguments on the command line
if [ $# != 2 ]
then
    usage
    exit
fi

pv $1 | parallel --pipe --files sort -S512M | parallel -Xj1 sort -S1024M -m {} ';' rm {} > $2
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This is excellent. Wasn't aware that there was a parallel package ! Sort time improved by more that 50% after using the above. Thanks. –  xbsd Jul 14 '13 at 0:14
    
I tried to use comm for diff on the files generated by this and its giving me warning that files are not sorted. –  ashishb Mar 1 at 1:56

Here is a script I wrote for this purpose. On a 4 processor machine it improved the sort performance by 100% !

#! /bin/ksh

MAX_LINES_PER_CHUNK=1000000
ORIGINAL_FILE=$1
SORTED_FILE=$2
CHUNK_FILE_PREFIX=$ORIGINAL_FILE.split.
SORTED_CHUNK_FILES=$CHUNK_FILE_PREFIX*.sorted

usage ()
{
     echo Parallel sort
     echo usage: psort file1 file2
     echo Sorts text file file1 and stores the output in file2
     echo Note: file1 will be split in chunks up to $MAX_LINES_PER_CHUNK lines
     echo  and each chunk will be sorted in parallel
}

# test if we have two arguments on the command line
if [ $# != 2 ]
then
    usage
    exit
fi

#Cleanup any lefover files
rm -f $SORTED_CHUNK_FILES > /dev/null
rm -f $CHUNK_FILE_PREFIX* > /dev/null
rm -f $SORTED_FILE

#Splitting $ORIGINAL_FILE into chunks ...
split -l $MAX_LINES_PER_CHUNK $ORIGINAL_FILE $CHUNK_FILE_PREFIX

for file in $CHUNK_FILE_PREFIX*
do
    sort $file > $file.sorted &
done
wait

#Merging chunks to $SORTED_FILE ...
sort -m $SORTED_CHUNK_FILES > $SORTED_FILE

#Cleanup any lefover files
rm -f $SORTED_CHUNK_FILES > /dev/null
rm -f $CHUNK_FILE_PREFIX* > /dev/null

See also: "Sorting large files faster with a shell script"

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18  
You can just use sort --parallel N as of GNU sort version 8.11 –  jhclark Sep 28 '11 at 13:09
1  
GNU coreutils 8.6 actually –  Benjamin Oct 17 at 14:16

Look carefully at the options of sort to speed performance and understand it's impact on your machine and problem. Key parameters on Ubuntu are

  • Location of temporary files -T directory_name
  • Amount of memory to use -S N% ( N% of all memory to use, the more the better but avoid over subscription that causes swapping to disk. You can use it like "-S 80%" to use 80% of available RAM, or "-S 2G" for 2 GB RAM.)

The questioner asks "Why no high memory usage?" The answer to that comes from history, older unix machines were small and the default memory size is set small. Adjust this as big as possible for your workload to vastly improve sort performance. Set the working directory to a place on your fastest device that has enough space to hold at least 1.25 * the size of the file being sorted.

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Memory should not be a problem - sort already takes care of that. If you want make optimal usage of your multi-core CPU I have implementend this in a small script (similar to some you might find on the net, but simpler/cleaner than most of those ;)).

#!/bin/bash
# Usage: psort filename <chunksize> <threads>
# In this example a the file largefile is split into chunks of 20 MB.
# The part are sorted in 4 simultaneous threads before getting merged.
# 
# psort largefile.txt 20m 4    
#
# by h.p.
split -b $2 $1 $1.part
suffix=sorttemp.`date +%s`
nthreads=$3
i=0
for fname in `ls *$1.part*`
do
    let i++
    sort $fname > $fname.$suffix &
    mres=$(($i % $nthreads))
    test "$mres" -eq 0 && wait
done
wait
sort -m *.$suffix 
rm $1.part*
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3  
Interesting script, but it does nothing to answer this question. –  Joachim Sauer Sep 1 '11 at 11:49
4  
split -b will split by bytes, thus truncating the lines at an arbitrary position –  ithkuil Feb 14 '12 at 11:50

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