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I use the R package GBM as probably my first choice for predictive modeling. There are so many great things about this algorithm but the one "bad" is that I cant easily use model code to score new data outside of R. I want to write code that can be used in SAS or other system (I will start with SAS (no access to IML)).

Lets say I have the following data set (from GBM manual) and model code:

library(gbm)
set.seed(1234)
N <- 1000
X1 <- runif(N)
X2 <- 2*runif(N)
X3 <- ordered(sample(letters[1:4],N,replace=TRUE),levels=letters[4:1])
X4 <- factor(sample(letters[1:6],N,replace=TRUE))
X5 <- factor(sample(letters[1:3],N,replace=TRUE))
X6 <- 3*runif(N)
mu <- c(-1,0,1,2)[as.numeric(X3)]
SNR <- 10 # signal-to-noise ratio
Y <- X1**1.5 + 2 * (X2**.5) + mu
sigma <- sqrt(var(Y)/SNR)
Y <- Y + rnorm(N,0,sigma)
# introduce some missing values
#X1[sample(1:N,size=500)] <- NA
X4[sample(1:N,size=300)] <- NA
X3[sample(1:N,size=30)] <- NA
data <- data.frame(Y=Y,X1=X1,X2=X2,X3=X3,X4=X4,X5=X5,X6=X6)
# fit initial model

gbm1 <- gbm(Y~X1+X2+X3+X4+X5+X6, # formula
data=data, # dataset
var.monotone=c(0,0,0,0,0,0), # -1: monotone decrease,
distribution="gaussian", 
n.trees=2, # number of trees
shrinkage=0.005, # shrinkage or learning rate,
# 0.001 to 0.1 usually work
interaction.depth=5, # 1: additive model, 2: two-way interactions, etc.
bag.fraction = 1, # subsampling fraction, 0.5 is probably best
train.fraction = 1, # fraction of data for training,
# first train.fraction*N used for training
n.minobsinnode = 10, # minimum total weight needed in each node
cv.folds = 5, # do 5-fold cross-validation
keep.data=TRUE, # keep a copy of the dataset with the object
verbose=TRUE) # print out progress

Now I can see the individual trees using pretty.gbm.tree as in

pretty.gbm.tree(gbm1,i.tree = 1)[1:7]

which yields

   SplitVar SplitCodePred LeftNode RightNode MissingNode ErrorReduction Weight
0         2  1.5000000000        1         8          15      983.34315   1000
1         1  1.0309565491        2         6           7      190.62220    501
2         2  0.5000000000        3         4           5       75.85130    277
3        -1 -0.0102671518       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    139
4        -1 -0.0050342273       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    138
5        -1 -0.0076601353       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    277
6        -1 -0.0014569934       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    224
7        -1 -0.0048866747       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    501
8         1  0.6015416372        9        10          14      160.97007    469
9        -1  0.0007403551       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    142
10        2  2.5000000000       11        12          13       85.54573    327
11       -1  0.0046278704       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    168
12       -1  0.0097445692       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    159
13       -1  0.0071158065       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    327
14       -1  0.0051854993       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    469
15       -1  0.0005408284       -1        -1          -1        0.00000     30

The manual page 18 shows the following:

enter image description here

Based on the manual, the first split occurs on the 3rd variable (zero based in this output) which is gbm1$var.names[3] "X3". The variable is ordered factor.

types<-lapply (lapply(data[,gbm1$var.names],class), function(i) ifelse (strsplit(i[1]," ")[1]=="ordered","ordered",i))

types[3]

So, the split is at 1.5 meaning the value 'd and c' levels[[3]][1:2.5] (also zero based) splits to left node and the others levels[[3]][3:4] go to the right.

Next, the rule continues with a split at gbm1$var.names[2] as denoted by SplitVar=1 in the row indexed 1.

Has anyone written anything to move through this data structure (for each tree), constructing rules such as:

"If X3 in ('d','c') and X2<1.0309565491 and X3 in ('d') then scoreTreeOne= -0.0102671518"

which is how I think the first rule from this tree reads.

Or have any advice how to best do this?

share|improve this question
    
I think IML in SAS could offer a solution. However, I don't really understand R here. Could you interpret more clearly about the pattern? –  Robbie Liu Feb 16 '12 at 12:29
    
Hi Robbie- No access to IML. Looking for a data step. I added the description of the column contents for pretty.gbm.tree. –  B_Miner Feb 17 '12 at 17:02
    
Maybe you could take a look at rattle which implements such a functionality for decision trees (as discussed on Cross Validated). I didn't check myself if this would apply with gbm output. –  chl Feb 23 '12 at 22:02
    
Have you figured this out? I've developed metaprogramming from R to SAS for party::ctree and nnet, and I'd like to have the same for GBM. –  Andrew Dec 3 '12 at 21:28
1  
@B_Miner if you still need help with this, I cranked one out this weekend. It's specific to my use case, but it should be fairly easy to edit. Lemme know and we can figure out a discreet way to transfer the files. –  Zelazny7 May 10 at 21:16

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