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I use the R package GBM as probably my first choice for predictive modeling. There are so many great things about this algorithm but the one "bad" is that I cant easily use model code to score new data outside of R. I want to write code that can be used in SAS or other system (I will start with SAS (no access to IML)).

Lets say I have the following data set (from GBM manual) and model code:

library(gbm)
set.seed(1234)
N <- 1000
X1 <- runif(N)
X2 <- 2*runif(N)
X3 <- ordered(sample(letters[1:4],N,replace=TRUE),levels=letters[4:1])
X4 <- factor(sample(letters[1:6],N,replace=TRUE))
X5 <- factor(sample(letters[1:3],N,replace=TRUE))
X6 <- 3*runif(N)
mu <- c(-1,0,1,2)[as.numeric(X3)]
SNR <- 10 # signal-to-noise ratio
Y <- X1**1.5 + 2 * (X2**.5) + mu
sigma <- sqrt(var(Y)/SNR)
Y <- Y + rnorm(N,0,sigma)
# introduce some missing values
#X1[sample(1:N,size=500)] <- NA
X4[sample(1:N,size=300)] <- NA
X3[sample(1:N,size=30)] <- NA
data <- data.frame(Y=Y,X1=X1,X2=X2,X3=X3,X4=X4,X5=X5,X6=X6)
# fit initial model

gbm1 <- gbm(Y~X1+X2+X3+X4+X5+X6, # formula
data=data, # dataset
var.monotone=c(0,0,0,0,0,0), # -1: monotone decrease,
distribution="gaussian", 
n.trees=2, # number of trees
shrinkage=0.005, # shrinkage or learning rate,
# 0.001 to 0.1 usually work
interaction.depth=5, # 1: additive model, 2: two-way interactions, etc.
bag.fraction = 1, # subsampling fraction, 0.5 is probably best
train.fraction = 1, # fraction of data for training,
# first train.fraction*N used for training
n.minobsinnode = 10, # minimum total weight needed in each node
cv.folds = 5, # do 5-fold cross-validation
keep.data=TRUE, # keep a copy of the dataset with the object
verbose=TRUE) # print out progress

Now I can see the individual trees using pretty.gbm.tree as in

pretty.gbm.tree(gbm1,i.tree = 1)[1:7]

which yields

   SplitVar SplitCodePred LeftNode RightNode MissingNode ErrorReduction Weight
0         2  1.5000000000        1         8          15      983.34315   1000
1         1  1.0309565491        2         6           7      190.62220    501
2         2  0.5000000000        3         4           5       75.85130    277
3        -1 -0.0102671518       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    139
4        -1 -0.0050342273       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    138
5        -1 -0.0076601353       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    277
6        -1 -0.0014569934       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    224
7        -1 -0.0048866747       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    501
8         1  0.6015416372        9        10          14      160.97007    469
9        -1  0.0007403551       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    142
10        2  2.5000000000       11        12          13       85.54573    327
11       -1  0.0046278704       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    168
12       -1  0.0097445692       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    159
13       -1  0.0071158065       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    327
14       -1  0.0051854993       -1        -1          -1        0.00000    469
15       -1  0.0005408284       -1        -1          -1        0.00000     30

The manual page 18 shows the following:

enter image description here

Based on the manual, the first split occurs on the 3rd variable (zero based in this output) which is gbm1$var.names[3] "X3". The variable is ordered factor.

types<-lapply (lapply(data[,gbm1$var.names],class), function(i) ifelse (strsplit(i[1]," ")[1]=="ordered","ordered",i))

types[3]

So, the split is at 1.5 meaning the value 'd and c' levels[[3]][1:2.5] (also zero based) splits to left node and the others levels[[3]][3:4] go to the right.

Next, the rule continues with a split at gbm1$var.names[2] as denoted by SplitVar=1 in the row indexed 1.

Has anyone written anything to move through this data structure (for each tree), constructing rules such as:

"If X3 in ('d','c') and X2<1.0309565491 and X3 in ('d') then scoreTreeOne= -0.0102671518"

which is how I think the first rule from this tree reads.

Or have any advice how to best do this?

share|improve this question
    
I think IML in SAS could offer a solution. However, I don't really understand R here. Could you interpret more clearly about the pattern? – Robbie Liu Feb 16 '12 at 12:29
    
Hi Robbie- No access to IML. Looking for a data step. I added the description of the column contents for pretty.gbm.tree. – B_Miner Feb 17 '12 at 17:02
    
Maybe you could take a look at rattle which implements such a functionality for decision trees (as discussed on Cross Validated). I didn't check myself if this would apply with gbm output. – chl Feb 23 '12 at 22:02
    
Have you figured this out? I've developed metaprogramming from R to SAS for party::ctree and nnet, and I'd like to have the same for GBM. – Andrew Dec 3 '12 at 21:28
1  
@B_Miner if you still need help with this, I cranked one out this weekend. It's specific to my use case, but it should be fairly easy to edit. Lemme know and we can figure out a discreet way to transfer the files. – Zelazny7 May 10 '14 at 21:16

The mlmeta package has a function gbm2sas that exports a GBM model from R to SAS.

share|improve this answer

Here is a very generic answer of how this might be done.

Add some R code to write the output to a file. https://stat.ethz.ch/R-manual/R-devel/library/base/html/sink.html

Then through SAS, access the ability to execute R with: http://support.sas.com/documentation/cdl/en/hostunx/61879/HTML/default/viewer.htm#a000303551.htm (You'll need to know where your R executable is to point the R code you have written above at the executable)

From there you should be able to manipulate the output within SAS to do any scoring you may need.

If it is simply a one time scoring and not a process, omit the SAS execution of R and simply develop SAS code to parse through the R output file.

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