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I write this small program. It compiled but it just did not print the arraysize as intended. What's wrong with my program?

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict; 
use warnings; 
my $primaryFeatures 
= { foo => [ 'fool', 'food', 'foot' ], 
    bar => ['barricade'], 
  }; 
 my $arraysize = $#{$primaryFeatures->{"foo"}}+1;
 print $arraysize;
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2  
What error are you getting? Is it printing the wrong result or do you get a warning or error? –  Platinum Azure Feb 15 '12 at 21:20

2 Answers 2

You're using array references as your hash values (as you should), so you need to dereference the array reference.

Also, if you use an array in a scalar context, then the size of the array is returned. In general, you should probably favor that over using the $# construct.

#!/usr/bin/perl -w

use strict; 
use warnings; 
my $primaryFeatures = {
    foo => [ 'fool', 'food', 'foot' ], 
    bar => ['barricade'], 
}; 
my $arraysize = @{$primaryFeatures->{foo}};
print $arraysize;
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+1 - $# is the index number of the last element in the array. It may not be the same as the number of elements of the array if, for example, the value of the (now deprecated) $[ variable has been changed. –  Leonardo Herrera Feb 15 '12 at 21:24
    
@Leonardo Herrera, If $[ is in use, then $#a + $[ still returns the correct value. That doesn't make $# wrong. –  ikegami Feb 15 '12 at 21:34
1  
$#{array} and @{array} − 1 also differ in that the former is an lvalue but the latter an rvalue. Just knowing that tidbit will get you talked about; actually using it may be grounds for mass opprobrium. ${array}[++$#{array}] = "new value" is thus an obfuscated push @{array}, "new value". –  tchrist Feb 15 '12 at 21:48
    
@ikegami - it is wrong if you use it to get the size of an array, as you point out with that ugly $[ + $#a construct. Using scalar @a is much more obvious (and readable, in the Perl sense at least.) –  Leonardo Herrera Feb 16 '12 at 13:19

Nothing is wrong with your program.

$ cat x.pl
use strict; 
use warnings; 
my $primaryFeatures 
= { foo => [ 'fool', 'food', 'foot' ], 
    bar => ['barricade'], 
  }; 
 my $arraysize = $#{$primaryFeatures->{"foo"}}+1;
 print $arraysize, "\n";

$ perl x.pl
3

(I added a newline to the output, but that's not relevant to the question.)

I do find the following cleaner, though:

 my $arraysize = @{ $primaryFeatures->{foo} };
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Thanks, but why it did not print anything if I write "print $arraysize;" And it will print as designed when I write "print $arraysize, "\n"; –  user288609 Feb 15 '12 at 22:04
    
Are you piping the output? You could be suffering from buffering. If so $|=1; will help. (Note that I've run it with and without the "\n". The only difference in the output is whether a newline is output after the number or not.) –  ikegami Feb 15 '12 at 22:16
    
@user288609 And if you try perl -e 'print 3', do you get the same "error" in not seeing the printed value? You may notice that since the value is not ended with newline, it is merged with the prompt, e.g. 3user@ubuntu:~$ . At least on *nix systems. –  TLP Feb 15 '12 at 22:20

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