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I have a long function declaration in C++ that I'm writing up in emacs. The indentation behavior with parenthesis doesn't make an exception for 80 columns and looks like:

std::vector<std::vector<double> > doFooBarBlahBlah(const std::map<std::pair<unsigned, std::string>, FoobarType> fooArg1,
                                                   const std::map<std::pair<unsigned, std::string>, FoobarType> fooArg2) {

Moving the argument to the next line and auto-indenting results in:

std::vector<std::vector<double> > doFooBarBlahBlah(
                                                   const std::map<std::pair<unsigned, std::string>, FoobarType> fooArg1,
                                                   const std::map<std::pair<unsigned, std::string>, FoobarType> fooArg2) {

The google C++ style guide suggests:

std::vector<std::vector<double> > doFooBarBlahBlah(
    const std::map<std::pair<unsigned, std::string>, FoobarType> fooArg1,
    const std::map<std::pair<unsigned, std::string>, FoobarType> fooArg2) {

Is there an emacs extension to automate indentation in a way that respects this rule?

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A couple of typedefs would make that code both narrow and readable. And more flexible as a bonus. –  molbdnilo Feb 17 '12 at 10:19

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Edited to account for column length exception This will do the trick for you:

(defun my-c-custom-settings ()
  (c-set-offset 'arglist-intro 'my-special-indent))
(add-hook 'c-mode-common-hook 'my-c-custom-settings)

(defun my-special-indent (pair)
  (let* ((symbol (car pair))
         (offset (cdr pair))
         (regular-column (c-lineup-arglist-intro-after-paren symbol)))
    (if (> (save-excursion (+ (aref regular-column 0)
                              (- (progn (end-of-line) (current-column))
                                  (progn  (beginning-of-line) 
                                          (skip-chars-forward " \t")
                                          (current-column)))))
           80)
        '+
      regular-column)))

The way to find out what setting needs be set for indentation is to move your cursor to the point you want to indent differently and do:

M-x c-set-offset

aka C-c C-o. And in this case you want to set it to '+ indicating to indent one more level than the current level. One of the settings can be a function which returns the offset.

There's a ton of information available in the manual for cc-mode on indentation, including how to customize it (I took the easy way in the sample above). As well as the documentation for c-offsets-alist.

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Thanks, but I actually prefer emacs's default if the line is short. I only want it to do this for long lines. I imagine it's probably not that easy to get emacs to do conditional indentation behavior like this... –  daj Feb 16 '12 at 0:51
    
@daj It's straightforward, I updated the answer to do what you want. –  Trey Jackson Feb 16 '12 at 3:30

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