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I have created objects by using new, but then have dereferenced them before adding them to a vector. Despite trawling the internet I cannot work out how I can call delete on these items. I want to do this just using standard C++ and STL I don't want (e.g.) to use Boost libraries.

As you can see a, b and c lose scope and I am left with what I presume to be copies in the vector. How can I go about deleting these. I don't want to store pointers in the array as I will need to pass an API function an array of doubles.

Please someone - how do I delete these objects?

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>

using namespace std;

vector<double> vectorDouble;
void createObjects();

void createObjects() {
    double* a=new double(13);
    double* b=new double(14);
    double* c=new double(15);
    //a,b and c are not contiguous memory blocks
    cout << "memory location of a: " << a << endl;
    cout << "memory location of b: " << b << endl;
    cout << "memory location of c: " << c << endl;

    vectorDouble.push_back(*a);
    vectorDouble.push_back(*b);
    vectorDouble.push_back(*c);
}

int main() {
    createObjects();
    //the memory addresses are contiguous 8 byte chunks
    cout << "vector memory at 0: " << &(vectorDouble[0]) << endl;
    cout << "vector memory at 1: " << &(vectorDouble[1]) << endl;
    cout << "vector memory at 2: " << &(vectorDouble[2]) << endl;

    //get pointer to the 2nd element
    double *P=&(vectorDouble[1]); 

    //dereference and look inside - two memory locations both contain the value 14
    cout << "vector Pointer P ["<< P <<"] contains " << *P <<endl;

    //Which should I call delete on? I have lost reference to the original pointers.
    //How should I call delete on the vector?

    cout << "deleting pointer that references 2nd vector element" << endl;
    delete P; //********* CRASH **********
    cout << "Done deleting" << endl;
}
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5 Answers 5

The objects you need to delete are not in the vector, because your vector elements are not created with new. You are just passing the copy of the malloc'd doubles, not the actual allocated double to the vector, when you use the dereference operator in the push_back.

You are actually just leaking them - your code would run fine without allocating doubles:

void createObjects() {
    vectorDouble.push_back(13);
    vectorDouble.push_back(14);
    vectorDouble.push_back(15);
}
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As everyone points out, there is no reason whatsoever to invoke new in your program:

void createObjects() {
    vectorDouble.push_back(13);
    vectorDouble.push_back(14);
    vectorDouble.push_back(15);
}

Suppose, however, that you do have some reason to call new. (I can't imagine what it might be, but let's assume you are a genius). Here is how you would do that:

void createObjects() {
    double* a=new double(13);
    double* b=new double(14);
    double* c=new double(15);
    //a,b and c are not contiguous memory blocks
    cout << "memory location of a: " << a << endl;
    cout << "memory location of b: " << b << endl;
    cout << "memory location of c: " << c << endl;

    vectorDouble.push_back(*a);
    vectorDouble.push_back(*b);
    vectorDouble.push_back(*c);

    delete a;
    delete b;
    delete c;
}

You see, the push_back doesn't put a copy of your pointer in the vector, it puts a copy of your object in the vector. Once you've made the copy of your object, then your object's memory serves no continuing purpose, and can be destroyed.

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OK, the reason that I am invoking new is that actually this program is representative of the real program I want to write: –  ben preston Feb 16 '12 at 8:43
    
OK, the reason that I am invoking new is that actually this program is representative of the real program I want to write: It is DirectX program and I want an array of D3DX10_SPRITE which is required to pass to the API function DrawSpritesBuffered. I could easily as you point out just create these objects without using new and this problem would go away. But should I be creating objects on the stack that might take up 20k? –  ben preston Feb 16 '12 at 8:51

The function createObjects is not putting the allocated values into the vector; it is putting in the values and then leaking the memory that a, b, and c pointed to. The call:

vectorDouble.push_back(*a);

stores the value pointed to by a in the vector (*a dereferences the pointer, which you probably already know). Once that function returns, the pointers are lost. You cannot retrieve them from the vector. You would either need to make a vector of pointers to doubles or (more likely) don't even allocate values; just store the doubles.

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I think I've got the problem, on:

vectorDouble.push_back(*a);
vectorDouble.push_back(*b);
vectorDouble.push_back(*c);

You are passing a, b and c as values so the array don't really contains the variables you have created (that's why they now have different memory address, they are a copy of the content of your variables!). Then you can delete the variables inside the method, don't use pointers inside the method or use an double* vector.

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Your leak is in createObjects(), because std::vector<>::push_back() makes a copy of its argument. You should delete the pointer before the end of scope of createObjects().

That said, I don't see why you use dynamic allocation to begin with. If you can avoid that please do (and you can, with a smart pointer like std::unique_ptr<>, or better yet with plain old doubles).

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Thanks for your reply. I have modified my code to delete the pointers at the end of the method. I now call clear() on the vector at the end. I assume now there are no memory leaks. One last question please; Are my doubles in the vector now on the heap or stack? –  ben preston Feb 16 '12 at 9:00
    
You don't need to call v.clear() at all, unless you wish to remove all the elements from the vector. If you say within a scope double *a = new double(13) then by the end of the scope you must say delete a, unless of course you pass a to another function or object that claims responsibility for a such that it itself will delete a. You can see this isn't simple, and that's why in C++ we always prefer to avoid dynamic allocation when we can. I'm not sure why you're not happy with v.push_back(13.0). –  wilhelmtell Feb 16 '12 at 12:19
    
OK, I will go with v.push_back(object). The Object will not be declared as a pointer and will not use new. It will persist beyond the scope of the method that created it because the vector has copied it and is managing that copy. This makes life a lot easier as I dont have to new/delete it. I will accept for the moment that I don't understand how the vector is managing the memory, but I can only assume that my statically declared objects got copied into heap memory when I used push_back. Thanks for your help. –  ben preston Feb 16 '12 at 13:30

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