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I have a text file with the following characteristics:

  1. every line has at least three "words" separated by a space
  2. a "word" can be any character or string of characters

I have appended some notes to some of the lines with tentative suggestions for changes to be made to the original words, and now would like to use sed to make those changes for me. So, to give a clearer picture, my file looks like this:

NO NO O
SIGNS NN O      #NNS
GIVEN VBD B-VP  #VBN
AT IN O
THIS NN O       
TIME NN O            ## B-NP
. PER O
...

Notes with 1 # are to replace the SECOND word in a line, and notes with 2 #'s are to replace the THIRD word in a line. Would anybody be able to suggest a way to do this with sed (or awk, or anything else)? Again to clarify (hopefully), my goal is to get the pattern following the # or ## and replace the nth word of the line with the matched pattern.

Thanks.

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is it possible to make it a rule that your notes have a predetermined amount of spaces after the #? Right now you show notes that have both zero and one spaces after the #, this makes the code unnecessarily harder to accommodate that. It would make it much easier if your notes have zero spaces after –  SiegeX Feb 16 '12 at 2:10
    
also, do you want the notes to be in the output? –  SiegeX Feb 16 '12 at 2:14
    
@SiegeX: yes, I should quite easily be able to remove the extra space in "## B-NP" or add a space in "#NNS", as desired. –  wayeast Feb 16 '12 at 2:19
    
@SiegeX: no, I don't want the note in the output -- I do want to keep a marker like "#" a couple of tabs after to designate the lines I've changed. –  wayeast Feb 16 '12 at 2:20
    
See updated answer –  SiegeX Feb 16 '12 at 2:30

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This will work for you:

awk '/#/{sub(/# +/,"#");n=gsub(/#/,"",$NF);$(n+1)=$NF;$NF="\t\t#"}1' file

Explanation

  1. /#/{ ... }: Search for lines that contain # and perform the following steps...
  2. sub(/# +/,"#"): Remove all spaces between the notes and the # if necessary
  3. n=gsub(/#/,"",$NF): Remove all # from the last field $NF and set the number of #'s removed to the variable n
  4. $(n+1)=$NF: Set the n+1 field $(n+1) to the new last field $NF which has all the # stripped off
  5. $NF="\t\t#": Set the last field $NF to two tabs followed by a #
  6. 1: Shortcut to tell awk to print the altered line
  7. file: Your input file

Example

$ awk '/#/{sub(/# +/,"#");n=gsub(/#/,"",$NF);$(n+1)=$NF;$NF="\t\t#"}1' file
NO NO O
SIGNS NNS O             #
GIVEN VBN B-VP          #
AT IN O
THIS NN O
TIME NN B-NP            #
. PER O
...

Note: If you make it so your notes always following the # with zero spaces in between, you can remove the entire sub(/# +/,"#"); part of the command to make it even shorter

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks. I'm unfamiliar with awk, so I'll have to do some studying up to understand what's going on here. I can't really translate your note into a different command, though. Would it be: awk '/#/{;t=$NF;n=gsub(/#/,"",t);$(n+1)=t}1' notes ?? This looks a little bizarre... –  wayeast Feb 16 '12 at 2:39
    
It would be /#/{n=gsub(/#/,"",$NF);$(n+1)=$NF;$NF="\t\t#"}1' file –  SiegeX Feb 16 '12 at 2:40
    
I just ran your command on my file and it appears to have worked perfectly. I can't thank you enough. –  wayeast Feb 16 '12 at 2:44
    
@user1212763 see updated answer with explanation –  SiegeX Feb 16 '12 at 2:44
    
@wayeast no problem, you can start by accepting the answer =) –  SiegeX Feb 16 '12 at 3:33

This might work for you:

sed 's/\S*\(\s*\S*\s*#\s*\)\([^#]*\)$/\2\1/;s/ *##*.*/\t\t#/' file
NO NO O
SIGNS NNS O             #
GIVEN VBN B-VP          #
AT IN O
THIS NN O       
TIME NN B-NP            #
. PER O
...
share|improve this answer
    
yes, this works as well. I had spent the longest time trying to do this in sed, and the command I came up with was nightmarish. The interpreter kept telling me that my /1 and /2 identifiers were invalid. –  wayeast Feb 17 '12 at 1:31
    
The trick here is to anchor the regexp to the end of the string ($) and use the the extra # to pull the back reference one field closer (see \(\s*\S*\s*#\s*\)). –  potong Feb 17 '12 at 8:44

Perl can handle this. Though I think I'd prefer to make it a script.

Paste version:

perl -lnwe 's/#\K\s+//; my @a=/\S+/g; if (@a>3) { $c = $a[3] =~ tr/#//d; $a[$c] = $a[3]; } print join " ", @a[0..2]' file

This version will print to stdout and not change the file. Add -i.bak, e.g. perl -i.bak -lnwe '....' to do in-place edit, with backup in file.bak.

Readable version:

$ perl -lnwe '       # -l: handle newlines, -n read file/stdin
    s/#\K\s+//;                    # strip optional spaces
    my @a = /\S+/g;                # extract the data
    if (@a > 3) {                  # when there are replacements..
        my $c = $a[3] =~ tr/#//d;  # count and remove #
        $a[$c] = $a[3];            # set element number $c to element 3
    } print join " ", @a[0..2]     # reassemble and print 3 first elements
' file

Output:

NO NO O
SIGNS NNS O
GIVEN VBN B-VP
AT IN O
THIS NN O
TIME NN B-NP
. PER O
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