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i answered one question about closures here in SO with this sample:

function Constructor() {
    var privateProperty = 'private';
    var privateMethod = function(){
        alert('called from public method');
    };
    return {
        publicProperty: 'im public',
        publicMethod: function(){
            alert('called from public method');
        },
        getter: privateMethod
    }
}

var myObj = new Constructor();

//public
var pubProp = myObj.publicProperty;
myObj.publicMethod();
myObj.getter();

//private - will cause errors
myObj.privateProperty
myObj.privateMethod

a user commented on my answer saying:

Also, if your function explicitly returns an object it is not a good practice to call it with new because that is misleading - if using new you'd expect the result to be an instance of Constructor

i usually create objects using new. but why is it not a good practice? it seems like using new and not using new returns the same thing. what is the proper way of creating objects from closures?

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1 Answer

up vote 7 down vote accepted

No, it's not the same thing. Consider when using instanceof:

function C1() {
    return {};
}

function C2() {
}

var c1 = new C1();
var c2 = new C2();
alert(c1 instanceof C1); // false; wha...?
alert(c2 instanceof C2); // true, as you'd expect.

Here's a demo.

So instead, create them by assigning to this, possibly with a safeguard to prevent forgotten news.

function Constructor() {
    var privateProperty = 'private';
    var privateMethod = function() {
        alert('Called from private method');
    };

    this.publicProperty = "I'm public!";
    this.publicMethod = function() {
        alert('Called from public method');
    };
    this.getter = privateMethod;
}

Even better, use the prototype when possible:

function Constructor() {
    var privateProperty = 'private';
    var privateMethod = function() {
        alert('Called from private method');
    };

    this.getter = privateMethod;
}

Constructor.prototype.publicProperty = "I'm public!";
Constructor.prototype.publicMethod = function() {
    alert('Called from public method');
};
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like this: jsfiddle.net/DZTC8/1 both return the same thing, with or without the new –  Joseph the Dreamer Feb 16 '12 at 2:47
4  
@Joseph: My point is that it makes instanceof act weird. The returned object is not an instance of the constructor, as a user would expect, but rather just an Object. –  minitech Feb 16 '12 at 2:48
    
+1 for "weird". thanks! now i get the idea. –  Joseph the Dreamer Feb 16 '12 at 2:58
    
@minitech Isn't the prototype not a good solution as you can never access the private members? –  jb10210 Apr 17 '12 at 12:01
    
@jb10210: JavaScript really has no concept of private members, just closed variables. It depends what you need to do. If you must have private variables, then those methods can be put inside the function; but then you won't be able to make direct calls. It really depends. But in the last part, I said "use the prototype where possible" - you'll notice that this.getter is still assigned to in the constructor because it has to access a private property. (Supposedly :)) The public method only needs access to the public property. –  minitech Apr 17 '12 at 13:16
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