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I've read that "volatile" in Java allows different threads to have access to the same field and see changes the other threads has made to that field. If that's the case, I'd predict that when the first and second thread have completely run, the value of "d" will be incremented to 4. But instead, each thread increments "d" to a value of 2.

public class VolatileExample extends Thread {
private int countDown = 2;
private volatile int d = 0; 

    public VolatileExample(String name) {
        super(name);
        start();
    }

    public String toString() {
       return super.getName() + ": countDown " + countDown;
    }

public void run() {
        while(true) {
        d = d + 1;
    System.out.println(this + ". Value of d is " + d);
    if(--countDown == 0) return;
    }
}

public static void main(String[] args) {
    new VolatileExample("first thread");
    new VolatileExample("second thread");
    }
}

The results from running this program are:

first thread: countDown 2. Value of d is 1

second thread: countDown 2. Value of d is 1

first thread: countDown 1. Value of d is 2

second thread: countDown 1. Value of d is 2

I understand that if I add keyword "static" the program, (that is, "private static volatile int d = 0;"), "d" would be incremented to 4. And I know that's because d will become a variable that the whole class shares rather than each instance getting a copy.

The results look like:

first thread: countDown 2. Value of d is 1

first thread: countDown 1. Value of d is 3

second thread: countDown 2. Value of d is 2

second thread: countDown 1. Value of d is 4

My question is, why doesn't "private volatile int d = 0; " yield similar results if volatile is supposed to allow the sharing of "d" between the two threads? That is, if the first thread updates the value of d to 1, then why doesn't the second thread grab the value of d as 1 rather than as zero?

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Thanks to the person (I think somehow the post got deleted) that suggested that it was a problem of atomicity. –  herrington Feb 16 '12 at 3:00
    
It was my first answer that I deleted you are talking about. I deleted it because after rereading your question I figured the problem here was a bit more complex than a simple "you need to synchronize". So I wrote the new answer below, focusing on what I thought was the real problem (understanding of instance vs static fields, threads and volatile), and just briefly mentioning synchronization. :) –  Bruno Reis Feb 16 '12 at 6:50
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3 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are a couple of misunderstandings here. You seem not to properly understand what a thread is, what an instance field is and what a static field is.

An instance field is a memory location that gets allocated once you instantiate a class (ie, a memory location gets allocated for a field d when you VolatileExample v = new VolatileExample()). To reference that memory location from within the class, you do this.d (then you can write to and read from that memory location). To reference that memory location from outside the class, it must be acessible (ie, not private), and then you'd do v.d. As you can see, each instance of a class gets its own memory location for its own field d. So, if you have 2 different instances of VolatileExample, each will have its own, independent, field d.

A static field is a memory location that gets allocated once a class is initialized (which, forgetting about the possibility of using multiple ClassLoaders, happens exactly once). So, you can think that a static field is some kind of global variable. To reference that memory location, you'd use VolatileExample.d (accessibility also applies (ie, if it is private, it can only be done from within the class)).

Finally, a thread of execution is a sequence of steps that will be executed by the JVM. You must not think of a thread as a class, or an instance of the class Thread, it will only get you confused. It is as simple as that: a sequence of steps.

The main sequence of steps is what is defined in the main(...) method. It is that sequence of steps that the JVM will start executing when you launch your program.

If you want to start a new thread of execution to run simultaneously (ie, you want a separate sequence of steps to be run concurrently), in Java you do so by creating an instance of the class Thread and calling its start() method.

Let's modify your code a little bit so that it is easier to understand what is happening:

public class VolatileExample extends Thread {
  private int countDown = 2;
  private volatile int d = 0;

  public VolatileExample(String name) {
    super(name);
  }

  public String toString() {
    return super.getName() + ": countDown " + countDown;
  }

  public void run() {
    while(true) {
      d = d + 1;
      System.out.println(this + ". Value of d is " + d);
      if(--countDown == 0) return;
    }
  }

  public static void main(String[] args) {
    VolatileExample ve1 = new VolatileExample("first thread");
    ve1.start();
    VolatileExample ve2 = new VolatileExample("second thread");
    ve2.start();
  }
}

The line VolatileExample ve1 = new VolatileExample("first thread"); creates an instance of VolatileExample. This will allocate some memory locations: 4 bytes for countdown and 4 bytes for d. Then you start a new thread of execution: ve1.start();. This thread of execution will access (read from and write to) the memory locations described before in this paragraph.

The next line, VolatileExample ve2 = new VolatileExample("second thread"); creates another instance of VolatileExample, which will allocate 2 new memory locations: 4 bytes for ve2's countdown and 4 bytes for ve2's d. Then, you start a thread of execution, which will access THESE NEW memory locations, and not those described in the paragraph before this one.

Now, with or without volatile, you see that you have two different fields d : each thread operates on a different field. Therefore, it is unreasonable for you to expect that d would get incremented to 4, since there's no single d.

If you make d a static field, only then both threads would (supposedly) be operating on the same memory location. Only then volatile would come into play, since only then you'd be sharing a memory location between different threads.

If you make a field volatile, you are guaranteed that writes go straight to the main memory and reads come straight from the main memory (ie, they won't get cached on some -- extremely fast -- processor-local cache, the operations would take longer but would be guaranteed to be visible to other threads).

It wouldn't, however, guarantee that you'd see the value 4 stored on d. That's because volatile solves visibility problem, but not atomicity problems: increment = read from main memory + operation on the value + write to main memory. As you can see, 2 different threads could read the initial value (0), operate (locally) on it (obtaining 1), then writing it to the main memory (both would end up writing 1) -- the 2 increments would be perceived as only 1.

To solve this, you must make the increment an atomic operation. To do so, you'd need to either use a synchronization mechanism -- a mutex (synchronized (...) { ... }, or an explicit lock) -- or a class designed specifically for this things: AtomicInteger.

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Thank you for your extremely well written answer. Your answer has been very helpful in explaining some of the concepts that were unclear to me . So to sum up, for d to be consistently incremented to 4, you'd have put static and synchronize the method within run by using something like "synchronized (this)"? Also, when I was reading this [article] (javamex.com/tutorials/…), it seemed to imply that two different threads were accessing the same variable. So I'm confused as to what the author of meant. –  herrington Feb 16 '12 at 3:13
    
"for d to be consistently incremented to 4 [...] ?" yes, that's it. Or you could replace d by private static final AtomicInteger d = new AtomicInteger(0);, and then increment with d.incrementAndGet(), which is an atomic increment operation (as an exercise: take a look at the JavaDocs for AtomicInteger, and try to implement your own version of the class -- you will probably end up using lots of synchronized; the actual implementation of AtomicInteger doesn't use synchronized, it uses non-blocking synchronization, which is a very interesting theme! look for compare-and-set). –  Bruno Reis Feb 16 '12 at 6:28
    
About the article you mentioned, I'd say you'd better run away from it! I've read the page you linked, and the one linked from there. It is very imprecise (and precision is absolutely necessary when discussing multithreading concepts), the author doesn't seem to understand what he is talking about. If you want a good text on multithreading, try the canonical "Java Concurrency in Practice": the language is not very hard and is extremely precise, it has lots of examples, real-world examples (not class Animal, class Dog extends Animal kind of bullshit). –  Bruno Reis Feb 16 '12 at 6:40
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volatile doesn't "allow the sharing" of anything. It just prevents the variable from being cached thread local, so that changes to the variables value occur immediately. Your d variable is an instance variable and is thus owned by the instance that holds it. You'll want to re-read the threading tutorials to re-align your assumptions.

One decent reference is here

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Thanks for the article. –  herrington Feb 16 '12 at 2:38
    
@herrington: you're quite welcome! –  Hovercraft Full Of Eels Feb 16 '12 at 2:44
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volatile can make sharing safe (if atomicity of a single read or write operation is sufficient), it doesn't cause sharing.

Note that if you make d static, it is actually unspecified what value d would have, because the statement d = d + 1 is not atomic, i.e. a thread may be interrupted between reading and writing d. A synchronized block, or an AtomicInteger are the typical solutions for that.

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