Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
boolean openingboard;
{   
Robot robot = new Robot();
Color color3 = new Color(108, 25, 85);
Rectangle rectangle = new Rectangle(0, 0, 1365, 770);
    while(true)
    {
    BufferedImage image = robot.createScreenCapture(rectangle);
    search: for(int x = 0; x < rectangle.getWidth(); x++)
        {
        for(int y = 0; y < rectangle.getHeight(); y++)
            {
                if(image.getRGB(x, y) == color3.getRGB())
                {
                    System.out.println("About to finish and return true");
                    return true;
                }
                System.out.println("About to finish and return false");
            }
        }
    }
}

the error is: java:71: return outside method

return true

^

i don't know what this is happening please help!

share|improve this question
1  
Is all this code inside a method? –  Adam Mihalcin Feb 16 '12 at 2:27
    
inside the method openingboard? yea not the main method though should i post that? –  user1179522 Feb 16 '12 at 2:29
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

From your comment response above, I am going to make the educated guess that you believe that

boolean openingboard;
{
    return true;
}

defines a Java method called openingboard. This isn't the case. Java follows the C paradigm of requiring you to specify your parameters in parentheses, regardless of whether you have any parameters or not. So, the method

boolean openingboard() {
    return true;
}

is a valid Java method (assuming it is inside some class), as is a version of openingboard with much more code between the curly braces.

That said, I'm going to pass along a few friendly pointers on Java style:

  • Java (and indeed most higher-level language) programmers tend to frown on "forever" loops such as while (true), since those loops make it much harder to determine when the loop actually stops.
  • There is no need for the label search in the code, and labels are even more discouraged than forever loops are.

So, I would recommend rewriting your code to look something like

private boolean openingboard() {
    Robot robot = new Robot();
    Color color3 = new Color(108, 25, 85);
    Rectangle rect = new Rectangle(0, 0, 1365, 770);
    BufferedImage image = robot.createScreenCapture(rect);
    for(int x = 0; x < rectangle.getWidth(); x++) {
        for(int y = 0; y < rectangle.getHeight(); y++) {
            if(image.getRGB(x, y) == color3.getRGB())
                return true;
        }
    }

    return false;
}

assuming of course that you prefer a debugger to trace prints.

share|improve this answer
    
I have not heard much commentary - positive nor negative - regarding labels. I would have thought them benign. So why are they frowned upon? –  emory Feb 16 '12 at 17:09
    
@emory Unless you are using labels for a nested break or continue, there is absolutely no value to a label that a comment doesn't provide. As a result, a comment conforms much better to convention. A label is OK for nested break/continue statements, but unnecessary for any other reason. I would classify a Java label in with a C goto: it's useful to improve readability in a very limited set of circumstances, but don't use it outside that set. –  Adam Mihalcin Feb 16 '12 at 22:27
add comment

Proper methods look like: boolean openingboard ( )

not like boolean openingboard;

The parenthesis are not optional.

The way you have it: openingboard is a field. There is a init block with a Robot and a color and some for loops nested inside of each other. Inside one of the for loops is a return which is not allowed in an init block.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.