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This is an example code from a book. I assume it's for Ruby 1.8.

    birthyear = 1986
    generation = case birthyear
        when 1946...1963: "Baby boomer"
        when 1964...1976: "Generation X"
        when 1977...2012: "new generation"
        else nil
    end

    puts generation

I ran it on Ruby 1.9, and got this error message:

    Untitled 2.rb:12: syntax error, unexpected ':', expecting keyword_then or ',' or ';' or '\n'
    when 1946...1963: "Baby boomer"
                     ^
Untitled 2.rb:13: syntax error, unexpected keyword_when, expecting $end
    when 1964...1976: "Generation X"

How should I change this?

share|improve this question
up vote 37 down vote accepted

There was a change in the syntax between 1.8.x and 1.9.x where the : is now no longer allowed:

 birthyear = 1986
 generation = case birthyear
   when 1946...1963
     "Baby boomer"
   when 1964...1976
     "Generation X"
   when 1977...2012
     "new generation"
   else
     nil
   end

 puts generation

Technically : has been replaced by then but that's an optional keyword if you use a newline. It's a bit of a hassle to go and track down cases where you've used the old syntax, so hopefully searching for case is close enough.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks @tadman , I got it. – Anders Lind Feb 16 '12 at 4:31
7  
"There was a change in the syntax between 1.8.x and 1.9.x where the : is now no longer allowed" – The : was never allowed. It was never part of the official syntax of Ruby. It was never documented. It was added to MRI's parser for reasons unknown and it was left in for fear that a change to the parser might break something, but Matz has always made it very clear that : in case and if expressions is not part of the syntax, that it must not be used and that it will be removed from the MRI parser in the future, which Koichi Sasada finally did in YARV. – Jörg W Mittag Feb 16 '12 at 13:31
1  
I started using them in 1.8.x quite religiously as they seemed to be the "standard", even if de-facto rather than official. It was a rude awakening when 1.9.x pulled support. At least I was able to make a Ruby regexp to fix the broken code at the time. – tadman Feb 17 '12 at 1:06

According to the 3rd edition of the PickAxe, it is intentional.

p 125, Case Expressions :

"Ruby 1.8 allowed you to use a colon character in place of the then keyword. This is no longer supported."

example, with then and no newlines:

birthyear = 1986
generation = case birthyear
  when 1946...1963 then "Baby boomer"
  when 1964...1976 then "Generation X"
  when 1977...2012 then "new generation"
  else nil
end

puts generation
share|improve this answer

You can just replace the colons with semi-colons.

Just tested this example:

birthyear = 1986
generation = case birthyear
    when 1946...1963; "Baby boomer"
    when 1964...1976; "Generation X"
    when 1977...2012; "new generation"
    else nil
end

puts generation

The semi-colon works exactly the same as a new line in this context, I think.

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There is a mistake in your puts

puts generation  # not "gemeration"

also try something like this :

score = 70

result = case score
  when 0..40 then "Fail"
  when 41..60 then "Pass"
  when 61..70 then "Pass with Merit"
  when 71..100 then "Pass with Distinction"
  else "Invalid Score"
end

puts result
share|improve this answer
2  
Indent code with four spaces for proper formatting, or use back ticks for inline code. – tadman Feb 16 '12 at 4:30

This is the correct way to do it:

score = 70
result = case score
   when 0..40 then "Fail"
   when 41..60 then "Pass"
   when 61..70 then "Pass with Merit"
   when 71..100 then "Pass with Distinction"
   else "Invalid Score"
end
puts result
share|improve this answer

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