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I can't understand why this won't work

decimal? compRetAmount = !string.IsNullOrEmpty(txtLineCompRetAmt.Text) 
    ? decimal.Parse(txtLineCompRetAmt.Text.Replace(",","")) 
    : null;
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2  
We're not mind readers, what doesn't work? –  Ash Burlaczenko Feb 16 '12 at 9:20
2  
It's called the conditional operator, not the ternary operator –  Thomas Levesque Feb 16 '12 at 9:23
    
@JakubKonecki although it is clear. It's always good to provide as much info as possible. In this case a compilation error –  Oskar Kjellin Feb 16 '12 at 9:23
2  
@ThomasLevesque, From msdn, One operator, the conditional operator (?:), takes three operands and is the sole ternary operator in C#. –  Ash Burlaczenko Feb 16 '12 at 9:28
3  
Sure, it's a ternary operator, but that's not its name, that's its type –  Thomas Levesque Feb 16 '12 at 9:29

6 Answers 6

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Because null is of type object (effectively untyped) and you need to assign it to a typed object.

This should work:

decimal? compRetAmount = !string.IsNullOrEmpty(txtLineCompRetAmt.Text) 
         ? decimal.Parse(txtLineCompRetAmt.Text.Replace(",","")) 
         : (decimal?)null;

or this is a bit better:

decimal? compRetAmount = !string.IsNullOrEmpty(txtLineCompRetAmt.Text) 
         ? decimal.Parse(txtLineCompRetAmt.Text.Replace(",","")) 
         : default(decimal?);

Here is the MSDN link for the default keyword.

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Thanks a lot slugster. –  Zo Has Feb 17 '12 at 5:08
    
fanbloodytastic! –  northpole Apr 11 '13 at 21:16
    
The best response is the one that doesn't just answer but informs and educates.. nice one slugster –  Alan Alcock May 12 at 8:51

Try this:

decimal? compRetAmount = !string.IsNullOrEmpty(txtLineCompRetAmt.Text) ? decimal.Parse(txtLineCompRetAmt.Text.Replace(",", "")) : (decimal?) null;

The problem is that the compiler does not know what type nullhas. So you can just cast it to decimal?

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Don't use decimal.Parse.

Convert.ToDecimal will return 0 if it is given a null string. decimal.Parse will throw an ArgumentNullException if the string you want to parse is null.

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decimal? compRetAmount = !string.IsNullOrEmpty(txtLineCompRetAmt.Text) ?  
                          decimal.Parse(txtLineCompRetAmt.Text.Replace(",","")) : 
                          (decimal?)null;
share|improve this answer

Because the compiler can't infer the best type from the operands of the conditional operator.

When you write condition ? a : b, there must be an implicit conversion from the type of a to the type of b, or from the type of b to the type of a. The compiler will then infer the type of the whole expression as the target type of this conversion. The fact that you assign it to a variable of type decimal? is never considered by the compiler. In your case, the types of a and b are decimal and some unknown reference or nullable type. The compiler can't guess what you mean, so you need to help it:

decimal? compRetAmount = !string.IsNullOrEmpty(txtLineCompRetAmt.Text)
                             ? decimal.Parse(txtLineCompRetAmt.Text.Replace(",",""))
                             : default(decimal?);
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You need to cast the first part to decimal?

decimal? compRetAmount = !string.IsNullOrEmpty(txtLineCompRetAmt.Text) 
    ? (decimal?)decimal.Parse(txtLineCompRetAmt.Text.Replace(",","")) 
    : null;
share|improve this answer
1  
That wouldn't make a difference. A decimal can be put into a decimal?. –  Ash Burlaczenko Feb 16 '12 at 9:23
    
"The output type of the ternary operator is the type of the first part": this is not true... it can be the type of either the first or second part, depending on which conversions exist between them –  Thomas Levesque Feb 16 '12 at 9:24
1  
You can assign a decimal to a decimal? without explicit casting. –  slugster Feb 16 '12 at 9:25
    
@slugster - yes. –  Jakub Konecki Feb 16 '12 at 9:28
2  
@ThomasLevesque - cheers, Thomas. I always thought that's the case. That's why I love SO - you can always learn sth new. –  Jakub Konecki Feb 16 '12 at 9:29

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