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I have a function like this:

void something(void *obj)
{
    obj->Set();
}

The compiler says that left of the dereference operator has to be a pointer to a class/struct/union/generic (translated from german not sure about wording).

The idea is that I want to call the something function of obj no matter what is passed to something. It is ensured that it has this function. How can i achieve that?

--EDIT--

I started to work on an existing Software which has like > 100 Classes for datatypes. In one part of the code there is a big switch statement which depending on an id creates an instance of one of these classes and calls the Set function for that one. Now i want to do multiple of these calls parallel, and because of this i want to bring the ->Set() call to a seperate function which i then can call in a new thread. Sadly there is no baseclass and i cant change too much in the "big picture". What is the best way to do this?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 1 down vote accepted

C++ doesn’t allow this (for good reasons: even if you can ensure that the object always has a function, C++ cannot, and since you can make mistakes, C++ is justified in distrusting you).

The proper way to do this is to have a common base class which defined this method for all types that you want to use here, and then use this common base class as the argument of this function.

Alternatively, if it’s known at compile time which type is used here, then the appropriate implementation uses templates:

template <typename T>
void f(T const& obj) {
    obj.something();
}

Whatever you do, void* is not appropriate. There are very rare legitimate use-cases for it in C++.

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sadly no baseclass there and would be a way too big change in the existing software to creat one. would a function pointer as suggested in another answer be an acceptable solution? (edited question) –  Flo Feb 16 '12 at 10:08
    
@Flo Tricky. Yes, the function pointer might be a viable solution if retrofitting > 100 classes with a common base class isn’t (I feel your pain ;-)). –  Konrad Rudolph Feb 16 '12 at 11:36

You need a base class or interface for whatever is passed into doSth:

class Base
{
public:
   virtual void something() = 0; //override this in derived classes
}

doSth(Base* obj)
{
   obj->something();
}

You can also cast the void* back to the original type:

doSth(void* obj)
{
   ((Base*)obj)->something();
}

but passing a void* as parameter suggests a faulty design. What exactly are you trying to achieve?

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A faulty design, or that he's using one of the hundreds of highly useful C APIs still out there. Or perhaps receiving a pointer over IPC. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 16 '12 at 9:49
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit a pointer to an object? –  Luchian Grigore Feb 16 '12 at 9:54
    
No, a pointer to an object. There is no such thing as "a pointer to a class". –  Lightness Races in Orbit Feb 16 '12 at 9:56
    
@LightnessRacesinOrbit it's what I meant. So he's receiving a pointer to a C object on which he wants to call methods? –  Luchian Grigore Feb 16 '12 at 9:57
    
edited my question, no base class sadly, and i dont know how to cast because i dont know the class of obj (many possible). –  Flo Feb 16 '12 at 10:06

You need to implement pure virtual Base class with this function:

class Base
{
   public:
   virtual ~Base(){}
   virtual void somefunction()=0;
}

class Derived1: public Base
{
   public:
   void somefunction()
   {
     //do something
   }
}

class Derived2: public Base
{
   public:
   void somefunction()
   {
     //do something
   }
}

And than use dynmic cast to get Base* from void*

doSth(void *obj)
{
  Base *bobj=dynamic_cast<Base*>(obj);
  if ( bobj )
    bobj->somefunction();
}

Or mor simplier:

doSth(Base *obj)
{
  obj->somefunction();
}

And usage is like:

Base *p1 = new Derived1(); 
Base *p2 = new Derived2();
doSth(p1); // cals somefunction in Derived1 class
doSth(p2); // cals somefunction in Derived2 class   
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The doSth method could take a function pointer as a parameter.

doSth( (*someFunc)() ) {
 obj->*someFunc();
}

The call would look like:

doSth( &function );

When passing function pointers between different classes you should create a typedef for each function pointer and use qualifiers for each function identifier.

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Just define an interface that lists all the functions of all the objects that you want to reference by the pointer, but the type of this pointer should not be void, but the name of this interface instead.

Then you will be able to call every function of every object that you want by this pointer, but make sure that all structures and classes of the objects implement all the functions of the interface!

This is also important to write the : and then the name of the interface in the header of every structure and class!

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include some code to show example to others –  Piyush May 2 at 21:06

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