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I have the following code:

#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int(* a)[10];  //declare a as pointer to array 10 of int
    int b[10];    // taken a array of 10 int
    b[2]=32;       
    a=&b;      
    printf("b is on %p\n",&b);
    printf("a is on %p\n",a);
    printf("magic is %d\n",a[2]); // why this is not showing 32
    return 0;
}

output:

b is on 0xbfa966d4
a is on 0xbfa966d4
magic is -1079417052

Here I have taken a as pointer to array 10 of int which points to the array b, so now why am I unable to get the value of 32 on a[2]?

a[2] is evaluated as *(a+2) so now a has address of array b so *(b+2) and *(a+2) are similar so why am I not getting value 32 here?


Edit : i got answer by using

(*a)[2]

but i am not getting how it works ... see when

a[2] is *(a+2) and a+2 is a plus 2 * sizeof(int[10]) bytes.

this way (*a)[2] how expand?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

By the rules of pointer arithmetic, a[2] is *(a+2) and a+2 is a plus 2 * sizeof(int[10]) bytes.

(Think of an ordinary int *p; p+1 is p plus sizeof(int) bytes and (char *)(p + 1) is different from (char *)p + 1. Now replace int with int[10])

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oyh this is what i was missunderstood...!! thanks –  Mr.32 Feb 16 '12 at 9:49
    
It would work using ((int*)a)[2] –  Eregrith Feb 16 '12 at 10:04
    
@Eregrith: I think that would violate the strict aliasing rule and cause undefined behavior. –  larsmans Feb 16 '12 at 10:20
    
when a[2] is *(a+2) and a+2 is a plus 2 * sizeof(int[10]) this way how (*a)[2] will expand? –  Mr.32 Feb 16 '12 at 10:21
    
*a is an int[10], more specifically b, so this fetches the third element in b. –  larsmans Feb 16 '12 at 10:27

Since a is already a pointer, you have to dereference it in order to refer to the array that it points to:

(*a)[2]
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#include<stdio.h>

int main()
{
    int(* a)[10];  //declare a as pointer to array 10 of int
    int b[10];    // taken a arry of 10 int
    b[2]=32;       
    a=&b;      
    printf("b is on %p\n",&b);
    printf("a is on %p\n",a);
    printf("magic is %p\n",a + 2); // Changed to show pointer arithmetic
    return 0;
}

This prints the following:

b is on 0xbfe67114
a is on 0xbfe67114
magic is 0xbfe67164

Do you see what's going on? magic minus a equates 80, that is, 4 * 10 * 2. This is because a is a pointer to an array of ten integers, so sizeof(*a) == 10 * sizeof(int) and not sizeof(a) == sizeof(int), which is what you was expecting to. Pay attention to types in pointer arithmetic next time!

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yea got it..thanks ..!!! –  Mr.32 Feb 16 '12 at 10:00

int b[10] == int* that points to the first value in the array

int (*a)[10] == int** that point to the address of a pointer that points to an array

a+2 == (&b)+2

Hope this clears things up for you

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This is wrong. b is not int*, a is not int**, and int* a[10] is different from int (*a)[10]. –  interjay Feb 16 '12 at 9:48
    
@interjay Yeah, the way I wrote it first would produce me an array of 10 int*. But b is an int* –  SS 'Kain' Feb 16 '12 at 9:52
    
No, b is not an int*, but it can decay to an int* in some (not all) contexts. However, a will never decay to an int** because they behave completely differently. And your line about a pointing to the address of a pointer is wrong as well. –  interjay Feb 16 '12 at 9:54
    
@interjay well when taken out of the context of the question it is wrong, but in his case it is true. Will try to answer the question more generally next time –  SS 'Kain' Feb 16 '12 at 10:08
    
It's wrong regardless of context. –  interjay Feb 16 '12 at 10:15

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