Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Suppose I have a function that does something on an arbitrary container type (C++11):

template<class containerType>
void bar( containerType& vec ) {

        for (auto i: vec) {
                std::cout << i << ", ";
        }

        std::cout << '\n';
}

I can call this function from another function like this:

void foo() {
        std::vector<int> vec = { 1, 2, 3 };
        bar(vec);
}

Now suppose I have different functions just like bar, and I want to pass one of these functions to foo, then foo would look something like this:

template<class funcType>
void foo( funcType func ) {
    std::vector<int> vec = { 1, 2, 3 };
    func(vec);
}

However, calling foo like this:

foo(bar);

does not work (pretty clear, since bar is not a function but a function template). Is there any nice solution to this? How must I define foo to make this work?

EDIT: here is a minimal compileable example, as demanded in the comments...

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <list>

template<class containerType>
void bar( containerType& vec ) {

        for (auto i: vec) {
                std::cout << i << ", ";
        }

        std::cout << '\n';
}

template<typename funcType>
void foo(funcType func) {

        std::vector<int> vals = { 1, 2, 3 };
        func(vals);

}

int main() {
        // foo( bar );  - does not work.
}
share|improve this question
    
you are missing minimal compilable example –  BЈовић Feb 16 '12 at 9:39
1  
Why do you use use function pointers? I believe that using an functor would be better here. –  AlexTheo Feb 16 '12 at 10:27
    
@AlexTheo Thanks for your comment. Of course, using functors the solution is simple! Bob posted a similar solution as an answer. I'll go with that! –  fdlm Feb 16 '12 at 10:51
add comment

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Something like this? (not fully awake, might miss the point)

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <list>

struct Test{
template<class containerType>
static void apply( containerType& vec ) {

        for (auto it = vec.begin(); it != vec.end(); ++it) {
                std::cout << *it << ", ";
        }

        std::cout << '\n';
}
};

template<class FuncStruct>
void foo() {

        std::vector<int> vals;
        vals.push_back(1);
        FuncStruct::apply(vals);

}

int _tmain(int argc, _TCHAR* argv[])
{
    foo<Test>();
    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! Just as @AlexTheo pointed out in the comments, using a functor is probably the easiest solution here. –  fdlm Feb 16 '12 at 10:53
add comment

Online demo at http://ideone.com/HEIAl

This allows you to do foo(bar). Instead of passing in a template-function or a template-class, we pass in a non-template class that has a template-member-function.

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <list>

struct {
    template<class containerType>
    void operator() ( containerType& vec ) {

        for (auto i = vec.begin(); i!=vec.end(); ++i) {
                std::cout << *i << ", ";
        }

        std::cout << '\n';

    }
} bar;

template<typename funcType>
void foo(funcType func) {

        std::vector<int> vals = { 1, 2, 3 };
        func(vals);

}

int main() {
        foo( bar );
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

If you know that foo works with a vector of int, you can pass bar< std::vector<int> > function.

A reasonable solution would be for the module that defines foo to also define typedef for the container used. Then you don't even need bar to be a template.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I'd prefer that the caller of foo does not know how foo works internally - he just knows that he has to pass a function that operates on arbitrary containers. –  fdlm Feb 16 '12 at 10:19
    
@fldm: See edit. –  Juraj Blaho Feb 16 '12 at 10:36
1  
@fdlm but the function does not operate on arbitrary containers. It is a template function, so think of it as creating the function for the required container type at compile time. –  juanchopanza Feb 16 '12 at 10:37
    
@juanchopanza Yes, but I don't want the caller of foo to know which container foo uses internally. So the template instanciation has to take place in the foo function itself –  fdlm Feb 16 '12 at 10:58
    
@JurajBlaho: That would be a reasonable solution, but I personally prefer the functor-solution, as it exposes less internals to the user of the foo function. –  fdlm Feb 16 '12 at 11:01
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.