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Is it possible to set a constrain that all classes implementing an interface must have, for example, an empty constructor? Like the where T : new() constraint in generic ?

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No, it is not possible to constrain constructors with an interface. – dasblinkenlight Feb 16 '12 at 9:58
up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are only four ways I can think of that you might be given a class at run-time which isn't known at compile-time. You might be given an instance of an object which implements an interface, and want to produce another one like it. That scenario would best be handled by having the interface include a NewSimilarInstance() method. You might have a method in some class which gets passed a generic type parameter which is constrained to your interface. In that scenario, the routine which accepts the generic parameter could have a new() constraint. Otherwise, you could be given a .net System.Type object or some other representation (such a string) for the type. In these latter two scenarios, no compile-time validation is going to be meaningful; doing anything with the types will require Reflection, and so you may as well use Reflection to see if they allow the creation of new instances.

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it's something of a mix between the first two scenarios. I think your suggestion of NewSimilarInstance() is an excellent one in my situation. Thanks! – Louis Rhys Feb 17 '12 at 2:07

No - its not possible to place any such constraints on derived classes or implementors of a given interface.

Such constrains generally wouldn't be a particularly good idea / useful anyway, as generally when working with an interface you are normally working with instances of objects that implement that interface in which case the object has naturally already been created and such constraints are redundant. (The exception of course being generics, in which case you can use the new() constraint).

My guess is that you are attempting to create some sort of plugin system and wish to constrain implementations of your plugin interface to have some default constructor that you can use for instantiation... if this is the case then there are normally better alternatives that you can use, such as the MEF.

Can you elaborate more on why exactly you need this?

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I want to use a generic type with interface type parameter (say IFoo), unfortunately I discover that we need to construct an IFoo object upon a very special condition. (I know, this is not good). I can put a new() constrain on the generic type, but it doesn't work because IFoo doesn't have new() – Louis Rhys Feb 16 '12 at 10:44

No, there's nothing like that. It would be slightly odd, given that the normal use of interfaces is that the code using an interface shouldn't need to care about how it was instantiated - they shouldn't care about what the implementation class is, just that it implements the interface.

If you have some special use for this, I suggest you just write unit tests for it - if all the implementations will be in the same assembly, it should be pretty straightforward to do so, and will catch any errors at nearly the same time as compile-time...

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I think you need to use a virtual class for that.

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1  
Did you mean an abstract class? – vc 74 Feb 16 '12 at 10:03
    
Yeah, my bad. I've been doing a lot of vb lately and it's messing with me. – linkerro Feb 16 '12 at 11:34

As Justin said not only you can't constrain constructor signatures using an interface but also it's not possible using an abstract class. Maybe if you would explain why you need to place such a constrain we could find some other solutions for your problem

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Inject a Factory into your generic class that can instantiate your interface, and drop the new() constraint.

Something like:

public interface IFactory<out T>
{
    T CreateInstance();
}

public class GenericClass<T>
{
     private readonly IFactory<T> _factory;

     public GenericClass(IFactory<T> factory)
     {
          _factory = factory;
     }

     public DoSomething()
     {
          //...
          T foo = _factory.CreateInstance();
          //...
     }
}
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