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I have a function that tries to log stuff to the console and also to a log file, but it doesn't work. The second use of the variable length argument gives garbage written to the console. Any ideas?

    void logPrintf(const char *fmt, ...) {
        va_list ap;    // log to logfile
        va_start(ap, fmt);
        logOpen;
        vfprintf(flog, fmt, ap);
        logClose;
        va_end(ap);
        va_list ap2;   // log to console
        va_start(ap2, fmt);
        printf(fmt, ap2);
        va_end(ap2);
    }
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What are you using C or C++ ? –  Tony The Lion Feb 16 '12 at 10:10
    
You need to use vprintf the second time, not printf. –  Greg Prisament Dec 10 '13 at 19:57
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3 Answers 3

You can't use the same va_list twice, nor get it twice. You have to use va_copy():

va_list ap, ap2;
va_start(ap, fmt);
va_copy(ap2, ap);
// ... with ap
// ... with ap2
va_end(ap2);
va_end(ap);

On some systems, __va_copy() is available instead; you may want to use #ifdef for that. If you use glib, it does that for you using G_VA_COPY().

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Yes, this. va_lists are very counterintuitive, and implementations vary a lot. It's vitally important to follow the spec: you can get away with, e.g., copying a va_list with = on some platforms, but it'll cause you endless grief on others. The stdarg man page is worth studying. –  David Given Feb 16 '12 at 11:31
1  
A va_list may be used twice. But it requires two calls to va_start(), with va_end() in between: –  shipr Mar 27 '12 at 21:24
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Upgrade your compiler, that is more like C++:

template <typename... Args>
void logPrintf(const char *fmt, Args&&... args) {
    logOpen;
    fprintf(flog, fmt, args...);
    logClose;

    printf(fmt, args...);
}

Though of course it would then be good taste to provide typesafe versions of printf and fprintf.

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Above example requires C++11. –  David Given Feb 16 '12 at 11:32
    
@DavidGiven: yes (thus the upgrade your compiler). –  Matthieu M. Feb 16 '12 at 13:08
    
I think vfprintf needs to be fprintf instead here--you're passing the actual arguments rather than a va_list. –  John Zwinck yesterday
    
@JohnZwinck: Indeed, thanks for the correction. –  Matthieu M. yesterday
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I think this way makes more sense:

void logPrintf(const char *fmt, ...) {
        va_list ap;    // log to logfile
        va_start(ap, fmt);
        logOpen;
        vfprintf(flog, fmt, ap); //logfile
         printf(fmt, ap); //console
        logClose;
        va_end(ap);
    }
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Thanks Tony, but that doesn't work either. It's like the pointer gets left at the end of the list so the second use gets garbage. –  Neddie Feb 16 '12 at 10:19
    
Yup, that's exactly what's happening. va_lists are always pass-by-reference. –  David Given Feb 16 '12 at 11:33
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