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I have the following code

internal abstract class Base
{
    public DateTime Time;
    public string Message;
    public string Log;
    public abstract void Invoke(string message);
}

internal class SubA : Base
{
    public override void Invoke(string message)
    {
        Time = DateTime.Now;
        // Do A
    }
}

internal class SubB : Base
{
    public override void Invoke(string message)
    {
        Time = DateTime.Now;
        // Do B
    }
}

I have these SubA and SubB classes which inherits from Base class, you can see that i have a code that repeating it self which is setting the Time, is there a way to move the setting of the time to the base class?

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6 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There a many possible solutions.

This depends on when you want to have this propertie set.

If you want it immediately you can do this in the constructor of your Base class.

internal abstract class Base
{
    public DateTime Time;
    public string Message;
    public string Log;
    public abstract void Invoke(string message);

    public Base()
    {
        Time = DateTime.Now;
    }
}

internal class SubA : Base
{
    public override void Invoke(string message)
    {
        // Do A
    }
}

internal class SubB : Base
{
    public override void Invoke(string message)
    {
        // Do B
    }
}
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In this case SetTime should be protected. –  PVitt Feb 16 '12 at 10:34
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You could do something like this:

internal abstract class Base
{
    public DateTime Time;
    public string Message;
    public string Log;
    public void Invoke(string message){
         Time = DateTime.Now;
         this.InvokeInternal(message);
    }
    protected abstract void InvokeInternal(string message);
}

internal class SubA : Base
{
    protected override void InvokeInternal(string message)
    {
        // Do A
    }
}

internal class SubB : Base
{
    protected override void InvokeInternal(string message)
    {
        // Do B
    }
}
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1  
+1. Exactly what i would do. –  Jehof Feb 16 '12 at 10:34
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Use a virtual method instead:

internal abstract class Base
{
    public DateTime Time;
    public string Message;
    public string Log;
    public virtual void Invoke(string message) {
        Time = DateTime.Now;
    }
}

internal class SubA : Base
{
}

internal class SubB : Base
{
}

You can still override the method in subclasses where you want a different implementation.

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internal abstract class Base
{
    public DateTime Time;
    public string Message;
    public string Log;
    public virtual void Invoke(string message)
    {
        Time = DateTime.Now;
    }

}

internal class SubA : Base
{
    public override void Invoke(string message)
    { 
        base.Invoke(message);
        // Do A
    }
}

internal class SubB : Base
{
    public override void Invoke(string message)
    {
        base.Invoke(message);
        // Do B
    }
}
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check base reference: msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hfw7t1ce.aspx –  Mario A. Corchero Jiménez Feb 16 '12 at 10:35
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There are two practical options, depending on how rigorous you want your code contracts to be.

You can move the logic into a virtual method and allow the child types to overload the behaviour if they so choose to.

internal abstract class Base
{
    ...
    public virtual void Invoke(string message)
    {
        Time = DateTime.Now;
    }
}

internal class SubA : Base
{
    public override void Invoke(string message)
    {
        base.Invoke(message);
        // Do A
    }
}

internal class SubB : Base
{
    public override void Invoke(string message)
    {
        base.Invoke(message);
        // Do B
    }
}

This does however make it possible for derived types to not call the base method at all.

If it's catastrophic if the base functionality is not invoked and you want more certainty of the expected behaviour, you might want to make a stronger contract by providing an injection point into the middle of the base method:

internal abstract class Base
{
    ...
    public void Invoke(string message)
    {
        Time = DateTime.Now;
        this.InvokeCore(message);
    }

    protected abstract void InvokeCore(string message);
}

internal class SubA : Base
{
    public override void Invoke(string message)
    {
        // Do A
    }
}

internal class SubB : Base
{
    public override void InvokeCore(string message)
    {
        // Do B
    }
}
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There are plenty of answers already. As an alternative (and a bit of a ninja) approach, I ll suggest Lambda expressions used with method properties.

In your case;

 public class Base
  {
    public DateTime Time;
    public string Message;
    public string Log;
    public Action<string> Invoke { get; set; }

    public Base()
    {
       this.Invoke = InvokeDefault;
    }

    private void InvokeDefault(string message)
    {
       Time = DateTime.Now;
    }
  }

This way, we provide a default behavior to the base class. With lambda expressions you can create instances with different Invoke methods as follows..

var myInstance= new Base
  {
    Invoke = () => { Time = DateTime.Now.AddDays(7); }
  };

The invoke method is overridden only for this instance of the Base class. This gives more flexibility and help avoid unnecessary subclasssing.

Check this awesome post from Patrick Steele for details.

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