Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i need fast random double generator for parallel computing. Normal System.Random generator is too slow and it gives me same numbers. When i run my application in single thread, everything is OK. Number should be between 0 and 100. Any Ideas?

number = random.NextDouble() * 100;

share|improve this question
4  
If random gives you the same numbers all the time, you're likely not using it right. Also note that Random is not thread-safe. –  dasblinkenlight Feb 16 '12 at 11:05
    
Also note that generating truely random numbers is a big deal : random.org/randomness –  Myles McDonnell Feb 16 '12 at 11:13
2  
Very fast and thread-safe: return 4; –  Henk Holterman Feb 16 '12 at 11:15
    
Googling on the topic of 'parallel random number generator' hits O(10^6) references. I suggest OP does some research. –  High Performance Mark Feb 16 '12 at 11:20
    
The MSDN page says "The current implementation of the Random class is based on a modified version of Donald E. Knuth's subtractive random number generator algorithm." so I can't imagine it's overly complex and that you'd get much quicker? If you're simply worried about getting different numbers per thread you could seed separate instances of it with a value based on the current thread ID. –  Rup Feb 16 '12 at 11:24

3 Answers 3

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Here is my take on it (requires .net 4.0):

public static class RandomGenerator
{
    private static object locker = new object();
    private static Random seedGenerator = new Random(Environment.TickCount);

    public static double GetRandomNumber()
    {
        int seed;

        lock (locker)
        {
            seed = seedGenerator.Next(int.MinValue, int.MaxValue);
        }

        var random = new Random(seed);

        return random.NextDouble();
    }
}

and a test to check that for 1000 iterations each value is unique:

[TestFixture]
public class RandomGeneratorTests
{
    [Test]
    public void GetRandomNumber()
    {
        var collection = new BlockingCollection<double>();

        Parallel.ForEach(Enumerable.Range(0, 1000), i =>
        {
            var random = RandomGenerator.GetRandomNumber();
            collection.Add(random);
        });

        CollectionAssert.AllItemsAreUnique(collection);
    }
}

I don't guarantee that it will never return a duplicate value, but I've run the test with 10000 iterations and it passed the test.

share|improve this answer
1  
This isn't thread-safe because it's sharing a single Random instance -- seedGenerator -- across all threads. Sooner or later this will break in a multithreaded environment. –  LukeH Feb 16 '12 at 12:12
    
Good point, I missed the lock around the seedGenerator.Next(). I've updated the example. –  Trevor Pilley Feb 16 '12 at 12:36

If Random is giving you the same numbers then you're probably using it incorrectly, either by creating many instances in close succession (meaning that they'll all use the same seed and so generate the same sequence), or by using a single instance across several threads (thereby "breaking" that instance since it's not safe for multithreaded use).

If the speed and randomness of Random are good enough for you when running in a single thread then you could try wrapping it in a ThreadLocal<T> to ensure a separate instance for each thread in your multithreaded scenario:

var number = _rng.Value.NextDouble() * 100;

// ...

private static int _staticSeed = Environment.TickCount;
private static readonly ThreadLocal<Random> _rng = new ThreadLocal<Random>(() =>
    {
        int seed = Interlocked.Increment(ref _staticSeed) & 0x7FFFFFFF;
        return new Random(seed);
    });
share|improve this answer

I use the windows cryptoAPI for good random numbers. For performance I do a single call for a block of 8KB of random data and distribute numbers from that instead of call the cryptoAPI for each number. Not sure what the performance is in the end compared to the normal random. But the randomization is far better (check the internet for details on the Windows CryptoAPI)

This is the code;

// UNIT RandomNumberGeneratorBase
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Text;

namespace FastLibrary
{
    public abstract class RandomNumberGeneratorBase
{    
        private int _byteBufSize;
        private byte[] _buf;
        private int _idx;
        private int _lastsize;

        public RandomNumberGeneratorBase(int bufSize = 8092)
    {    
            _byteBufSize = bufSize;
            _buf = new byte[_byteBufSize];
            _idx = _byteBufSize;
        }

        protected abstract void GetNewBuf(byte[] buf);

        private void CheckBuf(int bytesFreeNeeded = 1)
        {    
            _idx += _lastsize;
            _lastsize = bytesFreeNeeded;
            if (_idx + bytesFreeNeeded < _byteBufSize) { return; }
            GetNewBuf(_buf);
            _idx      = 0;
            _lastsize = 0;
        }

        public byte GetRandomByteStartAtZero(int belowValue)
       {    
         return (byte)(Math.Round(((double)GetRandomByte() * (belowValue - 1)) / 255));
       }    

        public int GetRandomIntStartAtZero(int belowValue)
       {    
            return (int)(Math.Round(((double)GetRandomUInt32() * (double)(belowValue - 1)) / (double)uint.MaxValue));
       }    

        public byte GetRandomByte()
    {    
            CheckBuf();
        return _buf[_idx];
    }    

        public bool GetRandomBool()
    {    
            CheckBuf();
        return _buf[_idx] > 127;
    }    

        public ulong GetRandomULong()
    {    
            CheckBuf(sizeof(ulong));
        return BitConverter.ToUInt64(_buf, _idx);
    }    

        public int GetRandomInt()
    {    
            CheckBuf(sizeof(int));
        return BitConverter.ToInt32(_buf, _idx);
    }    

        /// <summary>
        ///     Double from 0 to 1 (might be zero, will never be 1)
        /// </summary>
        public double GetRandomDouble()
    {    
            return GetRandomUInt32() / (1d + UInt32.MaxValue);
    }    

        /// <summary>
        ///     Float from 0 to 1 (might be zero, will never be 1)
        /// </summary>
        public float GetRandomFloat()
    {    
            return GetRandomUInt32() / (1f + UInt32.MaxValue);
    }    

        public uint GetRandomUInt32()
    {    
            CheckBuf(sizeof(UInt32));
            return BitConverter.ToUInt32(_buf, _idx);
    }    
    }    
}    

// UNIT StrongRandomNumberGenerator
using System;
using System.Collections.Generic;
using System.Linq;
using System.Security.Cryptography;
using System.Text;

namespace FastLibrary
{
    public sealed class StrongRandomNumberGenerator : RandomNumberGeneratorBase
{    
        private RNGCryptoServiceProvider _rnd;

        public StrongRandomNumberGenerator()
    {    
            _rnd = new RNGCryptoServiceProvider();
    }    

        protected override void GetNewBuf(byte[] buf)
    {    
            _rnd.GetBytes(buf);
    }    

    }
}    
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.