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Can someone explain what is PHP doing here and if it is possible to get predictable result?

Could this be used for hiding messages?

echo '1' | 'z';
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PHP is just doing it's daily job. This echoes an expression, and the expression contains a bitwise operator. The result is predictable. –  hakre Feb 16 '12 at 11:07
    
for hiding what? –  Your Common Sense Feb 16 '12 at 11:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

It's using a bitwise OR operator

'1' = ASCII 0x31 = Binary 00110001
'z' = ASCII 0x7A = Binary 01111010

ORing the two gives

  00110001  1
| 01111010  z
= 01111011  {

which is 0x7B which is ASCII character {

And as has been pointed out, to make this reversible, XOR should be used rather than OR

XORing the two gives

  00110001  1
^ 01111010  z
= 01001011  K

which is 0x4B which is ASCII character K

Reversing:

  01001011  K
^ 01111010  z
= 00110001  1

EDIT

It's not a particularly strong code, but:

$plainTextMessage = "My secret message";
$secretCharacter = 'z';

$codedMessage = '';
for($i = 0; $i < strlen($plainTextMessage); $i++) {
    $codedMessage .= $plainTextMessage[$i] ^ $secretCharacter;
}
echo 'Coded Message is: '.$codedMessage.PHP_EOL;

$decodedMessage = '';
for($i = 0; $i < strlen($codedMessage); $i++) {
    $decodedMessage .= $codedMessage[$i] ^ $secretCharacter;
}

echo 'Decoded Message is: '.$decodedMessage.PHP_EOL;
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Thanks for detailed answer and sample code :D –  Kirill Gordeenko Feb 16 '12 at 11:43

If you do a bitwise operation between two strings, each character within a string represents an octet of 8 bits. The bitwise operation is then done character per character. That is converting a character into an integer first like with the ord function and then turning the result as a string (comparable to chr).

 echo '1' | 'z';

Is the same as

 echo chr(ord('1') | ord('z'));

Taken from the PHP manual:

Example #2 Bitwise XOR operations on strings

<?php
echo 12 ^ 9; // Outputs '5'

echo "12" ^ "9"; // Outputs the Backspace character (ascii 8)
                 // ('1' (ascii 49)) ^ ('9' (ascii 57)) = #8

echo "hallo" ^ "hello"; // Outputs the ascii values #0 #4 #0 #0 #0
                        // 'a' ^ 'e' = #4

echo 2 ^ "3"; // Outputs 1
              // 2 ^ ((int)"3") == 1

echo "2" ^ 3; // Outputs 1
              // ((int)"2") ^ 3 == 1
?>

The same conversion logic applies to the OR | operator:

<?php
echo 12 | 9; // Outputs '13'

echo "12" | "9"; // Outputs the 9 character (ascii 57)
                 // ('1' (ascii 49)) | ('9' (ascii 57)) = #57

echo "hallo" | "hello"; // Outputs the ascii values #104 #101 #108 #108 #111
                        // 'a' | 'e' = #101

echo 2 | "3"; // Outputs 3
              // 2 | ((int)"3") == 3

echo "2" | 3; // Outputs 3
              // ((int)"2") | 3 == 3
?>

If you do a bitwise operation between a string and an integer, strings are converted to integer first.

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| is an OR operator, no? –  Salman A Feb 16 '12 at 11:15
    
It is, but the XOR example shows what happens with the strings in bitwise operations as well. That's what the OP asked for. If you understand how the characters are used as integer values (and if you understand how bitwise operations work with integers), you should be able to understand. –  hakre Feb 16 '12 at 11:19
    
@SalmanA: Converted the example into | and added some explanation what's going on. –  hakre Feb 16 '12 at 11:35

| is a bitwise operator - instead of operating on a string, or object, it operates on the bits (i.e. the 0s and 1s). In this case, | is OR. That is, bits that are in the first or second argument are set.

When you represent both as bits, take the bits that are in common, then echo it as a string, it happens to be '{' in this case.

Yes, you could use this to encode things - a similar but better way to do this is using XOR instead of OR. Have a look at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/XOR_cipher.

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This is bit-wise "or" operator. It returns a result made of bits that were set to 1 in at least one of the elements ('1' or 'z').

All of the following give the same results:

$r1 = '1' | 'z';
$r2 = chr(49) | chr(122); // chr(49) is '1', chr(122) is 'z'
$r3 = chr(49 | 122); // result is chr(123), which is '{'

and all of them are equal to '{'. See proof here: http://ideone.com/YC048

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