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I started writing ASP.NET web apps after working with WinForms for some time. After few trial-error mistakes I finally realized how different are those two.Althought I know lots of advanced stuff about C# I never learnt the trivial stuff that I should before advancing to some harder stuff so Im asking here, beacuse some of the questions can't be answered trough tutorials but rather developer experiance,so I'll start:

In GDI+ when working with graphics which is the correct way to do it?

Bitmap bitmap;
Graphics g;

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
Bitmap bitmap = new Bitmap(200,200);
Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(bitmap);
}
public void SomeMethod()
{
g.DrawRectangle(somePen,someRectangle);
}
public void SomeOtherMethod()
{
g.DrawRectangle(someOtherPen,someOtherRectangle);
}

Example:

Bitmap bitmap;
Graphics g;

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
Bitmap bitmap = new Bitmap(200,200);
Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(bitmap);
}
public void SomeMethod()
{
g.DrawRectangle(somePen,someRectangle);
}
public void SomeOtherMethod()
{
g = Graphics.FromImage(bitmap);
g.DrawRectangle(someOtherPen,someOtherRectangle);
}

Example:

Bitmap bitmap;

protected void Page_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
Bitmap bitmap = new Bitmap(200,200);
}
public void SomeMethod()
{
Graphics g = Graphics.FromImage(bitmap);
g.DrawRectangle(somePen,someRectangle);
//Dispose pens,graphics..
}
public void SomeOtherMethod()
{
Graphics g1 = Graphics.FromImage(bitmap);
g1.DrawRectangle(someOtherPen,someOtherRectangle); 
//Dispose pens,graphics..
}

About static methods:

I have a bunch of methods that don't fit in any instance class,like some SQL methods that I need in different parts of app:

  • Should I create new instance class, put all of them in it. And when I need one of them create new Instance and call method that I need.
  • Should I create new static class and just call the one that I need without creating instance.

I learnt the hard way that static variables are global,meaning that if one user changes it, another user will have this value in that variable.

Static Int ID = 0;
UserA triggers some Sql method to fetch his ID into variable ID.
UserB comes to site and the ID value is UserA ID

Do the variables defined localy in static method share this behaviour? Is there any danger like this in using static methods?

About null: Is it really nessecery to check if object is null if you make sure that methods that you use on that nullable type variable don't return null:

List<string> list = new List<string>();
//List can only become null if we call some method that returns null or if we do 
list = null;

About Exception Handling: I read on few occassions something like "Don't catch exceptions you can't handle",what does this mean?

Why is putting try/catch "just to make sure that app don't chrash" inside method wrong other then performance?

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Hi! Can you please split your questions into 3 different ones? –  Rodrigo Vedovato Feb 16 '12 at 11:21
    
@rodrigovedovato I didn't have time to check answers until now,guess no point to split anymore, sorry. –  Unavailable Feb 17 '12 at 12:41

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Only trap exceptions you are going to handle.

Because it's better to crash your application, than to continue executing and say wipe out all the users data, or send an email to every customer, or turn on the cutter while some bloke has his head under it, or even get so far away from where teh problem occurred, debugging it is a mare.

There are cases, where it is reasonable to use try catch and swallow, but they are exceptions...

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Thank you for clarification, I really don't abuse Try Catch in my apps but just for future reference. –  Unavailable Feb 17 '12 at 12:47
    
There area lot of rights answers to this one, but there is only one wrong one, swallow an execption you have no credible way of dealing with and it will happen at the most awkward time, when you were least able to cope and make you look like an incompetent infront of everybody and his dog. :( –  Tony Hopkinson Feb 18 '12 at 22:46

One at a time gentleman please...

Null checking. Yes it is. IF you make sure null is n't returned. So IF that isn't the case, what happens.

Either null is a valid argumement and you do somthing else (such as nothing), or it is n't in which case you should throw an argument null exception as close to the problem as possible. Otherwise you end up with Spaghetti objects.

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You're using System.Drawing in an asp.net app. That's a bad idea unless you do absolutely everything right. Modifying it over the course of multiple page events is a particularly bad idea, because if an exception occurs, the bitmap never gets disposed (The GC views a Bitmap instance as 1kb object, while it actually occupies 20-100MB).

WPF is also prone to similar errors, but will scale slightly farther before crashing. Basically, if you're using big objects like Bitmaps and Images in an asp.net app, you have to manually manage the memory to keep the process from running out of memory quickly.

My advice is either use asp.net-safe library, or collect the changes that need to be made to the bitmap over time in a separate instruction queue, and do all your bitmap processing within a single using{}() clause.

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Really good points you made.That library is really nice one but I need actual drawing not just Image transformations. Best idea would be to process bitmap within a single using{}() clause, that would be most painless IMO. –  Unavailable Feb 17 '12 at 12:44

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