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I want to find a way to save a file to a desktop. Since every user has different user name, I found following code will help me find the path to someone else’s desktop. But how can I save the following to desktop? file.open(appData +"/.txt"); doesn't work. Can you please show me an example?

#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>
#include <fstream>
#include <direct.h>
#include <shlobj.h>
using namespace std;
int main ()
{
    ofstream file;  

    TCHAR appData[MAX_PATH];
    if (SUCCEEDED(SHGetFolderPath(NULL,
                                  CSIDL_DESKTOPDIRECTORY | CSIDL_FLAG_CREATE,
                                  NULL,
                                  SHGFP_TYPE_CURRENT,
                                  appData)))

    wcout << appData << endl; //This will printout the desktop path correctly, but
    file.open(appData +"file.txt"); //this doesn't work
    file<<"hello\n";
    file.close();
    return 0;
}

Microsoft Visual Studio 2010, Windows 7, C++ console

UPDATED:


#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>
#include <fstream>
#include <direct.h>
#include <shlobj.h>
#include <sstream> 
using namespace std;
int main ()
{
    ofstream file;  

    TCHAR appData[MAX_PATH];
    if (SUCCEEDED(SHGetFolderPath(NULL,
                                  CSIDL_DESKTOPDIRECTORY | CSIDL_FLAG_CREATE,
                                  NULL,
                                  SHGFP_TYPE_CURRENT,
                                  appData)))

    wcout << appData << endl; //This will printout the desktop path correctly, but
    std::ostringstream file_path; 
    file_path << appData << "\\filename.txt";//Error: identifier file_path is undefined

    file.open(file_path.str().c_str()); //Error:too few arguments in function call
    return 0;
}
share|improve this question
    
Windows paths are with `\` no? And you also need a name for the file. –  Tudor Feb 16 '12 at 11:09
3  
I think you are adding two character pointers. You want to concatenate the strings. Suggest using a stringstream, and pushing both onto it? Also, you don't actually seem to be putting in a file name, just the .txt extension. Haven't used Windows much recently, but won't it strop a bit about this? –  BoBTFish Feb 16 '12 at 11:11
    
@Tudor C++ and C can use / for directory separators, even on Windows! You're right about the file name though, .txt is a lousy name. –  Mr Lister Feb 16 '12 at 11:14
    
Aside from (I think) .txt not being a valid file name on Windows, your actual problem is with C++, not the OS. You cannot concatenate C strings the way you want to. No offense meant, but have you considered reading an introductory C++ book? –  sbi Feb 16 '12 at 11:22
    
@NewGuy You also need to decide which of the statements should be executed if the SHGetFolderPath call succeeds. You currently perform the wcout if it succeeds, and then the rest of the statements unconditionally. Is that what you want? –  Mr Lister Feb 16 '12 at 11:44

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You cannot concatenate TCHAR array using appData +"/.txt". Use a stringstream to construct the path and extract the full path of the file from it:

#include <sstream>

...

std::ostringstream file_path;
file_path << appData << "\\filename.txt";

file.open(file_path.str().c_str());

EDIT:

The following compiles, and executes correctly, for me with VS2010:

#include <iostream>
#include <windows.h>
#include <fstream>
#include <direct.h>
#include <shlobj.h>
#include <sstream>
#include <tchar.h>
using namespace std;
int main ()
{
    ofstream file;  

    TCHAR appData[MAX_PATH];
    if (SUCCEEDED(SHGetFolderPath(NULL,
                                  CSIDL_DESKTOPDIRECTORY | CSIDL_FLAG_CREATE,
                                  NULL,
                                  SHGFP_TYPE_CURRENT,
                                  appData)))

    wcout << appData << endl;
    std::basic_ostringstream<TCHAR> file_path;
    file_path << appData << _TEXT("\\filename.txt");

    file.open(file_path.str().c_str());
    file<<"hello\n";
    file.close();

    return 0;
}
share|improve this answer
    
it says file_path is undefined in file_path << appData << "\\filename.txt";? not sure why. and file.open(file_path.str().c_str()); says too few arguments in function call –  Learner_51 Feb 16 '12 at 11:26
    
@NewGuy, did you #include <sstream> and add the variable std::ostringstream file_path; ? –  hmjd Feb 16 '12 at 11:29
    
yes, I did. I have updated my original question just like the way you explained –  Learner_51 Feb 16 '12 at 11:40
    
@NewGuy, just updated answer. Is yours identical to this? –  hmjd Feb 16 '12 at 11:43
    
Thanks, when I created a new project and compile again, it worked. but nothing is saving in the desktop. when I print out file_path using cout, it shows a number and not a path –  Learner_51 Feb 16 '12 at 11:51
file.open(appData +"/.txt");

In this file path there is no filename.

Also this function call is invalid. You should pass the second parameter as a open type.

file.open(appData +"/file.txt", fstream::out); 

is the correct one.

share|improve this answer
1  
However, + on a TCHAR array does not concatenate strings, it'll just add pointers , and you end up with a wild pointer –  nos Feb 16 '12 at 11:15
    
Thanks for showing me with an example. but when I use file.open(appData +"/file.txt", fstream::out); it says, "/file.txt" can't be used in that way. Error: expression must have integarl or enum type –  Learner_51 Feb 16 '12 at 11:17
    
I think ios::out is the default for std::ostream. There's no need to pass it explicitly. –  sbi Feb 16 '12 at 11:19

You should use PathAppend to concatenate paths, which will handle missing and/or extra set of backslash (\) characters.

share|improve this answer

I am not sure whether this is available:

file.open("%userprofile%\\Desktop\\file.txt", fstream::out);

You may try.

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