Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have the following XML...

<configuration>
    <img name="name1" />
    <img name="name2" />
    <warn>
        <img name="warn1" />
    </warn>
</configuration>

...which I try to deserialize into...

[XmlType("img")]
public class ImageNameExceptionItemXml
{
    [XmlAttribute("name")]
    public string Filename;
}

[XmlRoot("configuration")]
public class ImageNameExceptionListXml: List<ImageNameExceptionItemXml>
{
    [XmlArray("warn")]
    [XmlArrayItem("img")]
    public ImageNameExceptionListXml WarnList { get; set; }
}

...but I end up with the WarnList property null.

I already tried...

[XmlElement("warn"}]
public ImageNameExceptionListXml WarnList { get; set; }

...or...

[XmlElement("warn"}]
public List<ImageNameExceptionItemXml> WarnList { get; set; }

...but I still end up with WarnList property null. Why is that?

share|improve this question
    
The schema looks not good. Is it possible to change? –  findcaiyzh Feb 16 '12 at 11:43
    
Not sure, but I don't think the Serializer likes deserializing the extra properties on what it think is an array. So this may be tricky without explicitly implementing IXmlSerializable. –  Balthy Feb 16 '12 at 11:51
    
@findcaiyzh I can only change the <warn> node. Maybe I can try <configuration> <img name="name1" /> <img name="name2" /> <warnImg name="warn1" /> </configuration> –  sjlewis Feb 16 '12 at 11:55
    
@sjlewis the problem is XmlSerializer just allow one type in array/list.<configuration><imgs><img... /><img ... /></imgs><warn ... /> is fine. –  findcaiyzh Feb 16 '12 at 12:00

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Let's go to the problem. The warn is a "root" element, so, you have to transform it in a class too:

The xml:

<?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
<configuration>
  <img name="name1" />
  <img name="name2" />
  <warn>
      <img name="warn1" />
      <img name="warn2" />
  </warn>
</configuration>

The class:

[XmlType("img")]
public class ImageNameExceptionItemXml 
{ 
    [XmlAttribute("name")]     
    public string Filename; 
}

[XmlType("warn")]
public class WarnExceptionItemXml
{
    [XmlElement("img")]
    public List<ImageNameExceptionItemXml> ImgList { get; set; }
}

[XmlRoot("configuration")]
public class ImageNameExceptionListXml
{
    [XmlElement("img")]
    public List<ImageNameExceptionItemXml> ImgList { get; set; }

    [XmlElement("warn")]
    public WarnExceptionItemXml WarnList { get; set; } 
}

And the deserialize test:

XmlSerializer xml = new XmlSerializer(typeof(ImageNameExceptionListXml));

ImageNameExceptionListXml teste = (ImageNameExceptionListXml)xml.Deserialize(new FileStream("XMLFile1.xml", FileMode.Open));
share|improve this answer
2  
Tested in vs2010, works, better than my answer. –  findcaiyzh Feb 16 '12 at 12:07
    
Thanks, guys. This did the trick. –  sjlewis Feb 16 '12 at 12:25
    
Do you have to repeat the same name both in [XmlElement] and [XmlType]? –  svick Feb 16 '12 at 12:26
    
So, anytime! =) –  Vinicius Ottoni Feb 16 '12 at 12:27
    
@svick nope, you can use only in [XmlElement], but is better to give the idea easier. And you using in a different class it's better to understand who class is connected to xml element. –  Vinicius Ottoni Feb 16 '12 at 12:31

XmlSerializer just allow one type in array/list. is fine. Post My test code:

[XmlType("img")]
[Serializable]
public class ImageNameExceptionItemXml
{
    [XmlAttribute("name")]
    public string Filename;
}

[XmlType("warn")]
[Serializable]
public class Warnning
{
    [XmlArrayItem(typeof(ImageNameExceptionItemXml))]
    public List<ImageNameExceptionItemXml> imgs { get; set; }
}

[XmlRoot("configuration")]
[Serializable]
public class ImageNameExceptionListXml
{
    [XmlArrayItem(typeof(Warnning))]
    public List<Warnning> warns{ get; set; }

    [XmlArrayItem(typeof(ImageNameExceptionItemXml))]
    public List<ImageNameExceptionItemXml> imgs { get; set; }

}

xml:

<configuration>
<imgs>
    <img name="name1" />
    <img name="name2" />
</imgs>
<warns>
    <warn>
      <imgs>
        <img name="warn2" />
        <img name="warn1" />
      </imgs>
    </warn>
    <warn>
      <imgs>
        <img name="warn3" />
        <img name="warn4" />
      </imgs>
    </warn>
 </warns>
</configuration>
share|improve this answer
    
Vinicius Ottoni's answer is better. –  findcaiyzh Feb 16 '12 at 12:08

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.