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Im probably missing the point totally here so apologies. But Im wondering what the difference between using 'this' and 'prototype' are in this context. And what I should really be using to construct rich classes that are reusable...

I have this...

function MyClass() {

}

MyClass.prototype.name = null;

MyClass.prototype.init = function () {

    console.log('init');

    MyClass.prototype.name = 'Peter set by proto';

    this.name = 'Peter set by this';

};

MyClass.prototype.SayName = function() {

    console.log(MyClass.prototype.name);
    console.log(this.name);
};

And on the page..

<script type="text/javascript">


        var myClass = new MyClass();
        myClass.init();
        myClass.SayName();

    </script>

The output is...

init
Peter set by proto
Peter set by this

So whats the differenve between proto and this I thought they both basically access the object/class...?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Simplly put, attribute of prototype will appear in all objects of the class, and attribute of the object just belongs to this object.

you set:

MyClass.prototype.name = 'Peter set by prototype';

and you console.log:

console.log(new MyClass().name);
console.log(new MyClass().name);
....

all of them would show 'Peter set by prototype'.

and if you set:

var myClass = new MyClass();
myClass.name = "Peter set by object";

and you console.log:

console.log(new MyClass().name);
console.log(myClass.name);
....

would show:

Peter set by prototype
Peter set by object

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When you attach any methods or properties via this to a class then all instances of inheriting child classes will also have these properties within them. On the other hand, you use prototype to add members to parent class only and yet child classes will inherit it thereby saving memory.

function Func(name){
  this.name = name;

  this.display = function(){
     alert(this.name);
  }
}

In the above case, any class who inherits Func class will have display method in their signature too which is redundant if you want it to be shared across other classes. As a best practice, you should only add those members (via this) to parent class that necessarily wouldn't be needed by child classes.

If you want a member to be shared and not adding it to all instances of child classes, use prototype:

function Func(name){
  this.name = name;
}

Func.prototype.display = function(){
   alert(this.name);
}

// child class calling display
function Child(name){
  Func.call(this, name); // this refers to Child class here
}

Child.prototype = new Func();
var cls2 = new Child('Johnson');
cls2.display(); // Johnson

As can be seen display method comes from parent Func class and available in child class.

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