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I need to search for initials (not sure if this is the right name, if it isn't, someone please alter the question) using Javascript. For example:

Search for "mas" using the subject "Abraham Maslow" would return true, and search for "John" in "Johnathan Smith" would also be true. However, search for "gold" on "Marygold Ding" would be false.

I initially thought of:

function search(initial, subjectsArray) {
    var result = [];
    var tmp = null;
    var initialLowercase = initial.toLowerCase();
    for (var i = 0; i < subjectsArray.length; i++) {
        tmp = subjectsArray[i].toLowerCase();
        if (tmp.startsWith(initialLowercase) 
                || tmp.indexOf(' ' + initialLowercase) != -1) {
            result.push(subjectsArray[i]);
        }
    }
    return result;
}

How to optimize this code?

share|improve this question
    
So, basically, you have a name (or a list of names), and you want to check if a certain substring is the start of either first or last name? Initials isn't the right word, but I also can't think of a better one. What guarantees can you make with regard to the format? –  Anthony Grist Feb 16 '12 at 11:58
    
Abbreviations? :) –  Joe Feb 16 '12 at 11:59
    
@AnthonyGrist The format of the subjects? They would be any list of strings containing one or more spaces... For example, one of the names would be only Karlson while other would be John Ronald Reuel Tolkien. –  RedDragon Feb 16 '12 at 12:01

4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Seems like you want to use "word boundary" matching in a case-insensitive regex, for example:

/\bmas/i.test("Abraham Maslow") === true

/\bJohn/i.test("Johnathan Smith") === true

/\bgold/i.test("Marygold Ding") === false

\b will match the beginning or end of a word, and the i at the end of the regex makes it case insensitive so that mas can match Maslow.

-- update:

If your strings contain accented chars, the \b will match on them even though we consider them to be part of the word. In that case you want to use (^|\s) instead, to match "start of string or some whitespace":

/(^|\s)c/i.test('Drácule Smith') === false

/(^|\s)dr/i.test('Drácule Smith') === true

/(^|\s)smi/i.test('Drácule Smith') === true

MDN regex documentation.

share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't work for (/\bc/i).test("Drácule Smith") :-( –  RedDragon Feb 16 '12 at 12:25
    
Because a "word-boundary" considers only a-z, A-Z, 0-9 to be word-ccharacters. I'll update my answer –  Matthew Gilliard Feb 16 '12 at 12:27

Why don't you use RegExp instead?

string.search(new RegExp('\\b' + word + '\S*', 'i')) !== -1

edit by @user24 to build this into function with same api as OP:

function search(initial, subjectsArray) {
  // Create regex for initial
  var regex = new RegExp('\\b' + initial + '\S*', 'i');
  // Find subjects which contain this substring
  for (var i = 0; i < subjectsArray.length; i++) {
    if(subjectsArray[i].search(regex) !== -1) {
      return true;
    }
  }

  return false;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't work in the following situation: 'Drácule Smith'.search(new RegExp('\\b' + 'c' + '\S*', 'i')) !== -1) :-( –  RedDragon Feb 16 '12 at 12:16

Cant you just <start of input or whitespace>Token

(/(^|\s)Drá/i).test("Dráculezz Smith")
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An alternative to regex is that you could store the letters of the name individually, with a 'matches' element at each level, containing the names that match that value (should be quite fast, but if you have a large number of names, the array will be huge).

array
| - m
| - matches
| - - 'Abraham Maslow'
| - - 'John Motson'
| - a
| - - matches
| - - - 'Abraham Maslow'
| - - s
| - - - matches
| - - - 'Abraham Maslow'
| - - - l
| - - - - matches
| - - - - - 'Abraham Maslow'
...
| - s
| - - matches
| - - 'Johnathan Smith'
| - - m
| - - - matches
| - - - - 'Johnathan Smith'
| - - - - i

This should be pretty well optimised for speed, because you can just do something like this to look up a name:

var initials = initial.split('');
var matches;
for (var x in initials)
{
    matches = initials[x];
}
matches = matches['matches']; // now contains ['Abraham Maslow','John Motson'] or ['Abraham Maslow'], etc

This way, you never go down a branch which has anything other than what you're interested in, so you'll never consider "Johnathan Smith" when the name doesn't start with "S", and never consider "John Motson" when the name starts with "Ma" instead of "Mo", etc.

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