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I'm using the following method to convert a response stream to a string. The stream contains JavaScript.

    public string GetFileAsString()
    {
        using (WebResponse response = this.GetWebResponse())
        {
            Stream responseStream = response.GetResponseStream();

            if (responseStream != null)
            {
                // Pipe the stream to a stream reader with the required 
                // encoding format.
                using (StreamReader reader = new StreamReader(
                                                 responseStream, 
                                                 Encoding.UTF8))
                {
                    return reader.ReadToEnd();
                }
            }

            return string.Empty;
        }

When I try to test the string for a valid terminator the result is always false e.g.

        // Check for a valid ; terminator.
        bool hasTerminator = script.EndsWith(";", StringComparison.Ordinal);

        if (!string.IsNullOrWhiteSpace(script) && !hasTerminator)
        {
            script += ";";
        }

        return script;

It looks to me like I require a smarter check but I'm not sure what is wrong. Any ideas?

share|improve this question
up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code actually works for me in a console app. inputting string as "test" and "test;" produces false and true respectively. However "test; " doesnt work, you might want to trimend() to remove whitespace:

script = script.TrimEnd();
share|improve this answer
    
I think that was the issue. I didn't think of that. Cheers! – James South Feb 16 '12 at 12:56

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