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If I use:

var strings = new List<string> { "sample" };
foreach (string s in strings)
{
  Console.WriteLine(s);
  strings.Add(s + "!");
}

the Add in the foreach throws an InvalidOperationException (Collection was modified; enumeration operation may not execute), which I consider logical, since we are pulling the rug from under our feet.

However, if I use:

var strings = new List<string> { "sample" };
strings.ForEach(s =>
  {
    Console.WriteLine(s);
    strings.Add(s + "!");
  });

it promptly shoots itself in the foot by looping until it throws an OutOfMemoryException.

This comes as a suprise to me, as I always thought that List.ForEach was either just a wrapper for foreach or for for.
Does anyone have an explanation for the how and the why of this behavior?

(Inpired by ForEach loop for a Generic List repeated endlessly)

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7  
I agree. This is - dubious. I wusggest you post that on microsoft connect and ask for clarification. –  TomTom Feb 16 '12 at 13:04
4  
"This comes as a suprise to me, as I always thought that List.ForEach was either just a wrapper for foreach or for for." It could still use for. You can perform the same action in a for loop and generate the same OutOfMemoryException as a result. –  Anthony Pegram Feb 16 '12 at 13:06
    
This is based on my question : stackoverflow.com/q/9311272/132239 , thanks SWeko for getting into it's details –  Sypress Feb 17 '12 at 11:08

4 Answers 4

up vote 67 down vote accepted

It's because the ForEach method doesn't use the enumerator, it loops through the items with a for loop:

public void ForEach(Action<T> action)
{
    if (action == null)
    {
        ThrowHelper.ThrowArgumentNullException(ExceptionArgument.match);
    }
    for (int i = 0; i < this._size; i++)
    {
        action(this._items[i]);
    }
}

(code obtained with JustDecompile)

Since the enumerator is not used, it never checks if the list has changed, and the end condition of the for loop is never reached because _size is increased at every iteration.

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Yeah, but how is _size calculated? If it's just pre-calculated then if should just run once for my example. It's obviously refreshed somehow. –  SWeko Feb 16 '12 at 13:12
7  
It is refreshed at Add method -> this._items[this._size++] = item; –  Fabio Gouw Feb 16 '12 at 13:15
1  
@SWeko, it's not calculated, it's updated every time an item is added or removed. –  Thomas Levesque Feb 16 '12 at 13:29
1  
There is a _version private variable in List<T> that could detect this kinds of scenarios, as it is updated on operations that change the list itself. –  SWeko Feb 16 '12 at 13:51
    
You could avoid exceptions by first getting the size (int theSize = this._size), then using it within the for loop? –  Lazlow Feb 22 '12 at 19:49

List<T>.ForEach is implemented through for inside, so it does not use enumerator and it allows to modify the collection.

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Because the ForEach attached to the List class internally uses a for loop that is directly attached to its internal members -- which you can see by downloading the source code for the .NET framework.

http://referencesource.microsoft.com/netframework.aspx

Where as a foreach loop is first and foremost a compiler optimization but also must operate against the collection as an observer -- so if the collection is modified it throws an exception.

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And to answer the comment on @Thomas post about how it refreshes -- the internal members are refreshed when add is called so that's why it's able to keep up with the changes. If you were to perform an insert, at an index less than the current one, you would never operate on that item because it's already iterated past that item. But since you're adding to the end it works. –  Michael Perrenoud Feb 16 '12 at 13:18
1  
Yes, changing the Add line with strings.Insert(0, s + "!") just prints out 'sample'. It's strange that this isn't mentioned at all in the documentation. –  SWeko Feb 16 '12 at 13:21
    
Well, I think Microsoft realized that it's just about impossible to provide every caveat that exists in their documentation -- so they provide their source code now. I find that a better solution honestly but the only problem I've found is that products like WF don't get updated as quickly -- 4.x WF source code still isn't available. –  Michael Perrenoud Feb 16 '12 at 13:26

We know about this issue, it was an oversight when it was originally written. Unfortunately, we can't change it because it would now prevent this previously working code from running:

        var list = new List<string>();
        list.Add("Foo");
        list.Add("Bar");

        list.ForEach((item) => 
        { 
            if(item=="Foo") 
                list.Remove(item); 
        });

The usefulness of this method itself is questionable as Eric Lippert pointed out, so we didn't include it for .NET for Metro style apps (ie Windows 8 apps).

David Kean (BCL Team)

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1  
I see that this would be a big bad breaking change, but nonetheless it can fail in non-obvious ways, and that's never a good thing. I cannot see a scenario where using the ForEach method is superior to a simple for (or foreach if mangling of the original list is not required) –  SWeko Feb 25 '12 at 21:12

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