Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I need to run this four times how can i do it in one line or may be less lines

update opp set run_mode = 0, run_time = 0, 
where oppar_job_name in ('ABC') ) and oppar_job_rec in ('ABC');

update opp set run_mode = 0, run_time = 0, 
where oppar_job_name in ('DEF') ) and oppar_job_rec in ('DEF');

update opp set run_mode = 0, run_time = 0, 
where oppar_job_name in ('FGH') ) and oppar_job_rec in ('FGH');

update opp set run_mode = 0, run_time = 0, 
where oppar_job_name in ('IJK') ) and oppar_job_rec in ('IJK');

I am thinking of trying this.

update opp set run_mode = 0, run_time = 0, 
where oppar_job_name in (
'ABC',
'DEF',
'FGH',
'IJK'
) and oppar_job_rec in 
(
'ABC',
'DEF',
'FGH',
'IJK'
);

Is the just above thing correct. I mean there is a one to one correspondence in the table like

ABC ABC
DEF DEF
FGH FGH
IJK IJK
share|improve this question
    
Your shortened SQL will also affect rows having ABC DEF, ABC FGH, ABC IJK,.. and so on –  Jayy Feb 16 '12 at 13:24
    
@KaipaMSarma no because he says there's a 1-to-1 correspondence between those two columns. –  Behrang Feb 16 '12 at 13:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 6 down vote accepted

If I understand well:

update opp set run_mode = 0, run_time = 0, 
where (oppar_job_name = oppar_job_rec) and 
      (oppar_job_rec in ('ABC','DEF','FGH','IJK'));

It's better with extra parenthesis ;-)

share|improve this answer
    
+1. smart work. I was looking for this. Btw are you smiling in the pic:) –  Jayy Feb 16 '12 at 13:27
    
I like this thanks@ulundo –  munish Feb 16 '12 at 13:30
    
thx guys. Yes am smiling! –  unludo Feb 16 '12 at 13:52

If there's a one-to-one correspondence between the columns, then your solution is correct (but has syntax errors) and unludo's solution is even better.

Otherwise you can make it more concise by avoiding multiple update statements like this:

update opp set 
    run_mode = 0, run_time = 0
where 
    (oppar_job_name in ('ABC') and oppar_job_rec in ('ABC')) OR
    (oppar_job_name in ('DEF') and oppar_job_rec in ('DEF')) OR
    (oppar_job_name in ('FGH') and oppar_job_rec in ('FGH')) OR
    (oppar_job_name in ('IJK') and oppar_job_rec in ('IJK'));

Finally you don't even need to use the in operator, so you can write something like this:

update opp set 
    run_mode = 0, run_time = 0
where 
    (oppar_job_name = 'ABC' and oppar_job_rec = 'ABC') OR
    (oppar_job_name = 'DEF' and oppar_job_rec = 'DEF') OR
    (oppar_job_name = 'FGH' and oppar_job_rec = 'FGH') OR
    (oppar_job_name = 'IJK' and oppar_job_rec = 'IJK');
share|improve this answer

If your oppar_job_name and oppar_job_rec predicates are always identical, I prefer unludo's answer.

Otherwise, if the parameters might be different, you can do something like this:

update opp set run_mode = 0, run_time = 0
where ( oppar_job_name, oppar_job_rec )
in ( ('ABCname' , 'ABCrec')
   , ('DEFname' , 'DEFrec')
   , ('FGHname' , 'FGHrec')
   , ('IJKname' , 'IJKrec')
   );
share|improve this answer
    
nice for a case of differnt parameters.thanks –  munish Feb 17 '12 at 14:21

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.