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i know there is a lot of questions about it, but most of them uses fixed sized converters, like 4 bytes to int and etc.
I have an templated functions to convert bytes to numbers and etc, but have a problem :D

template <typename IntegerType>
     static IntegerType bitsToInt(BYTE* bits, bool little_endian = true)
     {
         IntegerType result = 0;

         if (little_endian)
             for (int n = sizeof(IntegerType); n >= 0; n--)
                 result = (result << 8) + bits[n];
         else
             for (int n = 0; n < sizeof(IntegerType); n++)
                 result = (result << 8) + bits[n];

         return result;
     }

     template <typename IntegerType>
     static BYTE *intToBits(IntegerType value)
     {
         BYTE result[sizeof(IntegerType)] = { 0 };

         for (int i = 0; i < sizeof(IntegerType); i++)
             result = (value >> (i * 8));

         return result;
     }

     static void TestConverters()
     {
         short int test = 12345;

         BYTE *bytes = intToBits<short int>(test);

         short int test2 = bitsToInt<short int>(bytes); //<--i getting here different number, then 12345, so something goes wrong at conversion
     }

So, could anyone say what's wrong here?

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I haven't checked the whole thing, but for (int n = sizeof(IntegerType); n >= 0; n--) should probably read as for (int n = sizeof(IntegerType)-1; n >= 0; n--) –  Hybrid Feb 16 '12 at 13:30
2  
What compiler are you using? result = (value >> (i * 8)); should not even compile. Also you should try enabling warnings... –  PlasmaHH Feb 16 '12 at 13:31
    
and how does intToBits compile, when it's trying to assign a new value to the constant pointer 'result' ? shouldn't it be result[i] = ... ? –  Hybrid Feb 16 '12 at 13:33
    
i am using vc++ 2010 express and it compiles fine :P –  Kosmos Feb 16 '12 at 13:35
    
looks like it's full of bugs :( –  Hybrid Feb 16 '12 at 13:36

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

There are several bugs in the function intsToBits 1. Insted of

result = (value >> (i * 8)); 

there should be

result[i] = 0xFF & (value >> (i * 8)); 

More serious one you return the pointer to the memory on the stack, which is generally incorrect after you exit the function. You shoul allocate the memory with the new operator.

BYTE * result = new BYTE[sizeof(IntegerType)];

The you'll be needed to release the memory

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thanks! that's work fine now –  Kosmos Feb 16 '12 at 13:43
    
one more thing, now i need to use delete to free memory, but i can't use it in intToBits, because there is nothing to return then. is it correct to use delete bytes; at the end of TestConverners? –  Kosmos Feb 16 '12 at 13:46
    
@Kosmos: Yes it is "correct" to delete it there, but it is a bad practice to allocate something in a function and to force the user to care for it. Mainly because the user must know how you allocated the memory in the first place. It would probably better to either return a smart pointer (std::unique_ptr) or a std::vector (by value). –  ereOn Feb 16 '12 at 14:34
    
yes, this is exactly what i wanted to know about bad practice :P i think i will use vector for that. thanks –  Kosmos Feb 16 '12 at 14:48
static BYTE *intToBits(IntegerType value)

This is returning a pointer to locally allocated memory, which once the function returns goes out of scope and is no longer valid.

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This may not be your only problem, but intToBits is returning a pointer to a local variable, which is undefined behavior.

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Try using new to allocate the byte array you return

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